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The best music in Kansas City this weekend: Big Gigantic, Gary Clark Jr., Kitten and Le1f

Justin Bieber will perform at the Sprint Center Wednesday, April 6.
Justin Bieber will perform at the Sprint Center Wednesday, April 6. file photo

Gary Clark Jr.

Thursday, March 31, at the Uptown Theater

Just as previous generations of music lovers have embraced B.B. King, Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan, people born in the ’80s and ’90s have designated Gary Clark Jr. as their primary guitar-wielding blues hero. The Texan is a solid choice. Clark is revitalizing the blues on his The Story of Sonny Boy Slim tour.

Tickets range from $29.50 to $58.50 in advance through uptowntheater.com.

Kitten

Thursday, March 31, at the Tank Room

Kitten’s riotous performance at Ink’s Middle of the Map Fest in 2013 has become the stuff of Kansas City legend. Just as Chloe Chaidez, the front person of the Los Angeles band, has since matured, Kitten’s music has grown increasingly sophisticated. Kitten will showcase its ambitious new sound at Thursday’s sold-out show. With the Greeting Committee.

Tickets are $15 in advance through thetankroom.com.

Le1f

Friday, April 1, at the Riot Room

Before he compares his physique to a “black Ken doll” on his signature song “Wut,” Le1f suggests that “I’m the kind of john closet dudes want to go steady on.” The New Yorker rapper’s music is as colorful as his lyrics. A scintillating blend of vintage techno and cutting-edge dance music frames Le1f’s provocative raps. With Norrit.

Tickets are $15 in advance through theriotroom.com.

Kawehi

Saturday, April 2, at the Tank Room

Kawehi throws down the gauntlet with “Not Another Lame Fight Song,” a vengeful track on her new release “Interaktiv.” The Kansas-based one-woman band has successfully employed guerrilla marketing strategies including a popular YouTube channel and compelling TED Talks presentations to attract a national following for her striking craftsmanship and innovative performances.

Tickets are $12 in advance through thetankroom.com.

Andrew Foshee

Saturday, April 2, at the Brick

The Kansas City singer-songwriter Andrew Foshee channels the Southern charm of “Nashville Skyline”-era Bob Dylan on his charming new EP “Corvair.” The five new semi-psychedelic country-rock songs will sound especially appealing amid the neon lights and delectable aromas at the Brick on Saturday. With My Oh My and Kelly Hunt.

The cover charge is $7. Details are available at thebrickkcmo.com.

Big Gigantic

Saturday, April 2, at Arvest Bank Theatre at the Midland

If Kanye West hadn’t already co-opted Daft Punk’s motto of “harder, better, faster, stronger,” the phrase might have been adopted by Big Gigantic. The brassy pop made by the duo of Dominic Lalli and Jeremy Salken effectively incorporates the most rapturous elements of dubstep, funk and old-school disco. With Louis the Child and Melvv.

Tickets are $25 in advance through midlandkc.com.

She Is We

Saturday, April 2, at the Madrid Theatre

The moniker She Is We represents one of the most empowering band name changes in pop music history. Rachel Taylor and Trevor Kelly once made engaging electro-pop as He Is We. Following dramatic events that resulted in hard feelings and a bitter sense of betrayal, Taylor founded the Seattle based group She Is We. With We the Kings, AJR and Elena Coats.

Tickets are $25 and $35 in advance through ticketmaster.com.

The Record Company

Saturday, April 2, at Knuckleheads

An exciting new blues-rock band from Los Angeles, the Record Company revives the dangerous music immortalized by the likes of John Lee Hooker and Hound Dog Taylor with reckless abandon. By brandishing the blues with the energy of punk rockers, the trio appeals to traditionalists and to fashion-conscious trendsetters. With Reverend Peyton’s Damn Big Band.

Tickets are $17.50 in advance through knuckleheadskc.com.

Madisen Ward and the Mama Bear and the Project H

Sunday, April 3, at Kauffman Stadium

A pair of Kansas City’s musical heavy hitters will help set the tone during the pre-game opening day celebrations at Kauffman Stadium. Madisen Ward and the Mama Bear, the mother-and-son folk duo who had a winning record in 2015, will entertain at the Outfield Experience stage. The Project H, one of the shiniest jewels on Kansas City’s jazz scene, will perform at the Hy-Vee stage near Gate C.

The performances are free to ticketholders. Details are available at royals.com.

Father

Monday, April 4, at the Riot Room

Awful Records, the irreverent name Father selected for his record label, reflects the off-kilter attitude of the Atlanta artist. Laughably obnoxious and comically rude, Father is a role model for unconventional hip-hop artists who hope to establish a national brand without the help of traditional record labels. Rashiyd Ashon, Nemo and Rory Fresco are among the opening acts.

Tickets are $15 in advance through theriotroom.com.

Fred Eaglesmith

Tuesday, April 5, at Knuckleheads

The Fred Eaglesmith song “Kansas” typifies the Canadian singer-songwriter’s harrowing aesthetic. The song’s heartbroken narrator confesses that the Sunflower State is “where I always break down, it’s where my world tumbles to the ground.” A full band will help the veteran minstrel breathe life into his rugged songs on Tuesday. With Tif Ginn.

Tickets are $15 in advance through knuckleheadskc.com.

Justin Bieber

Wednesday, April 6, at the Sprint Center

Justin Bieber is in the unusual position of mounting a comeback at the tender age of 22. He’s obligated to surmount concerns about his questionable behavior as he attempts to make the perilous transition from teen idol to viable pop star. His efforts seem to be working. Wednesday’s concert is sold out. With Post Malone and Moxie Raia.

The face value of tickets to the sold-out concert range from $48.50 to $114 in advance through sprintcenter.com.

Joe Ely, Ruthie Foster and Paul Thorn

Wednesday, April 6, at the Folly Theater

Joe Ely and Ruthie Foster, a pair of revered Texans, team up with the irreverent Mississippi native Paul Thorn under the auspices of the Southern Troubadours. Each member of the trio is a proven entertainer with a vast catalog of beloved songs. Watching how well they’re able to share the stage with one another promises to be one of the most intriguing elements of Wednesday’s concert.

Tickets range from $20 to $45 in advance through follytheater.org.

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