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This week’s best live music: Zac Brown Band, Corb Lund, Mudhoney and the Flaming Lips

Broncho, Thursday, Sept. 11, at the RecordBar.
After a few years of scuffling as an undistinguished Midwestern rock band, Broncho has been thrust into the national spotlight. The band based in Norman, Okla., has recently been touted by prominent outlets, including NPR programs “World Cafe” and “All Songs Considered.” Powerful new songs “Class Historian” and “What” from the forthcoming album “Just Hip Enough to Be Woman” are as irresistible as the best work of the Strokes. Broncho is sharing its breakthrough moment with the Low Litas, an indie-rock trio from Oklahoma City. Two Kansas City bands — art rockers Various Blonde and frenetic punks Sneaky Creeps — open Thursday’s show. 
Tickets are $10 in advance through therecordbar.com.
Broncho, Thursday, Sept. 11, at the RecordBar. After a few years of scuffling as an undistinguished Midwestern rock band, Broncho has been thrust into the national spotlight. The band based in Norman, Okla., has recently been touted by prominent outlets, including NPR programs “World Cafe” and “All Songs Considered.” Powerful new songs “Class Historian” and “What” from the forthcoming album “Just Hip Enough to Be Woman” are as irresistible as the best work of the Strokes. Broncho is sharing its breakthrough moment with the Low Litas, an indie-rock trio from Oklahoma City. Two Kansas City bands — art rockers Various Blonde and frenetic punks Sneaky Creeps — open Thursday’s show. Tickets are $10 in advance through therecordbar.com.

Zac Brown Band, Thursday, Sept. 11, at Sporting Park.

What do relaxed singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffett and excitable indie-rock titan Dave Grohl have in common? They collaborate with the Zac Brown Band. The eclectic Atlanta-based collective bridges the vast gulf between the two sensibilities. Much of the band’s music is far more consequential than its lightweight hits “Chicken Fried” and “Toes.” In addition to contemporary country fare, the band plays Southern rock, bluegrass, reggae and bar band boogie with enthusiastic aplomb. The band will delve into the myriad styles during a performance that’s likely to extend well beyond two hours Thursday at Sporting Park.

Tickets range from $33.50 to $123.50 in advance through ticketmaster.com.

Pokey LaFarge’s Central Time Tour, Thursday, Sept. 11, at Knuckleheads.

Billed as a forum for “real American music,” Pokey LaFarge’s Central Time Tour is a welcome antidote for nostalgic curmudgeons prone to reminiscing about the good old days, even as it serves as a refreshing change of pace for younger listeners eager to experience an old-fashioned music revue. Honky tonk artist LaFarge will be joined by a band led by Joel Savoy, a member of the famed family of Cajun musicians; Dom Flemons, a founder of old-timey revivalist band the Carolina Chocolate Drops; the Loot Rock Gang, an acoustic blues ensemble from LaFarge’s base of St. Louis; and the Tillers, a string band from Cincinnati.

Tickets are $15 in advance through knuckleheadshonkytonk.com.

Broncho, Thursday, Sept. 11, at the RecordBar.

After a few years of scuffling as an undistinguished Midwestern rock band, Broncho has been thrust into the national spotlight. The band based in Norman, Okla., has recently been touted by prominent outlets, including NPR programs “World Cafe” and “All Songs Considered.” Powerful new songs “Class Historian” and “What” from the forthcoming album “Just Hip Enough to Be Woman” are as irresistible as the best work of the Strokes. Broncho is sharing its breakthrough moment with the Low Litas, an indie-rock trio from Oklahoma City. Two Kansas City bands — art rockers Various Blonde and frenetic punks Sneaky Creeps — open Thursday’s show.

Tickets are $10 in advance through therecordbar.com.

Clipping, Thursday, Sept. 11, at the Replay.

Clipping, an alternative hip-hop group from Los Angeles, distinguishes itself musically rather than lyrically. Most of the raps on the new Sub Pop Records release “Clppng” address such customary topics as the acquisition of money, celebrations of inebriation and disses of other hip-hop artists. The group even quotes a familiar line by the mainstream rapper Lil Wayne. It’s Clipping’s sound that’s different. Futuristic beats are propelled by unconventional elements like chimes, icy drones and white noise. Performances by two similarly experimental groups — Lawrence’s Ebony Tusks and Kansas City’s Heartfelt Anarchy — will precede Clipping’s appearance.

The cover charge is $3. Details are available in advance through replaylounge.com.

Mudhoney, Saturday, Sept. 13, at the Riot Room.

Unrepentantly juvenile and undeniably crude, Mudhoney’s filthy combination of punk and heavy metal epitomizes the essence of rock ’n’ roll. The crude bludgeoning of “Touch Me I’m Sick,” Mudhoney’s best-known song, typifies the rebellious nihilism of the Seattle grunge band. Bummer and Folkicide open Saturday’s show. The members of Bummer may not have been born when “Touch Me I’m Sick” was released in 1988, but the Olathe-based trio effectively evokes Mudhoney’s sonic onslaught. Kansas City’s Folkicide is an acoustic punk band.

Tickets are $20 in advance through theriotroom.com.

Brother Ali, Sunday, Sept. 14, at the Granada.

“There’s a thin line between anger and hunger, and I ride a unicycle down the middle,” Brother Ali raps on “Self Taught.” The politically oriented albino Muslim is one of the most respected members of Minnesota’s prestigious Rhymesayers crew. Such self-deprecating material as “Forest Whitaker” offsets the unsettling vitriol of seething songs. Brother Ali is touring with Bambu, another rapper with a unique perspective. The Filipino-American is a former gang banger from Los Angeles who now toils as a community organizer and socially conscious hip-hop artist.

Tickets are $13 in advance through thegranada.com.

Yacht, Monday, Sept. 15, at the RecordBar

Most musicians elect to join forces with complementary acts while organizing tours. Yacht and White Fang have opted for a different route. The only thing the two bands have in common is a base in Portland, Ore. Yacht performs playful electro-pop that has long been favored by the same art-minded crowd that appreciates the dance music of LCD Soundsystem. Before basking in Yacht’s shimmering sound, however, Monday’s audience at the RecordBar will have to endure the scuzzy garage rock of White Fang. The group’s loutish new album “Full Time Freaks” includes songs with titles like “Before I Pass Out.”

Tickets are $10 in advance through therecordbar.com.

Flaming Lips, Tuesday, Sept. 16, at Crossroads KC

The Flaming Lips lost a lot of good will among area rock fans when Lawrence-based drummer Kliph Scurlock was ousted from the band this year. The scuttlebutt related to the highly public split reflected poorly on the Flaming Lips’ flamboyant front man, Wayne Coyne. Even people who remain peeved at Coyne might be tempted to buy tickets to Tuesday’s concert to witness the second public performance by Electric Würms. The intriguing new project featuring Coyne and Flaming Lips’ musical mastermind Steven Drozd is an ethereal psychedelic band.

Tickets range from $40 to $81.50 in advance through crossroadskc.com.

Corb Lund, Tuesday, Sept. 16, at the Bottleneck

“Good Copenhagen is better than bad cocaine,” Corb Lund snorts on his potent new album, “Counterfeit Blues.” Yet the Canadian country artist shouldn’t be mistaken for a hayseed. Recorded live with his band, the Hurtin’ Albertans, at Sun Studios in Memphis, “Counterfeit Blues” acknowledges the influence that Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins and Elvis Presley had on Lund and his band. His honky tonk sound may have roots in Memphis, but Lund also evokes the recklessness of Ryan Adams, the hardscrabble poetry of Bob Dylan and the ferocious blues of Howlin’ Wolf.

The cover charge is to be determined. Details are available at thebottlenecklive.com.

Die Antwoord, Wednesday, Sept. 17, at Crossroads KC.

Die Antwoord straddles the nebulous division between high art and trash culture. The transgressive music videos of the South African group could be screened at contemporary art museums or be used as garish appetizers prior to showings of bloody slasher movies. Die Antwoord’s short films showcase the aberrant behavior of Ninja and Yolandi Visser. The pair are among the most peculiar figures in popular music. Abetted by the innovative hip-hop and electronic dance music of DJ Hi-Tek, Ninja and Yolandi Visser create deeply disturbing soundscapes.

Tickets range from $29 to $76.50 in advance through crossroadskc.com.

Bill Brownlee, Special to The Star

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