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U2’s KC show promises visuals like you’ve ‘never seen before.’ Fans already lined up

Fly over Arrowhead Stadium and see U2 concert stage

Hundreds of workers descend on Arrowhead Stadium to prepare for U2's concert to commemorate the 30th anniversary of "The Joshua Tree" album
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Hundreds of workers descend on Arrowhead Stadium to prepare for U2's concert to commemorate the 30th anniversary of "The Joshua Tree" album

Craig Evans remembers the last time U2 performed at Arrowhead Stadium. It was May 19, 1997.

“I remember the storm we had when we were loading out that night,” Evans, the band’s tour manager, said during a press conference Monday from the field at Arrowhead. “We had one of the nastiest rainstorms I’ve ever seen a live show played through.”

He shouldn’t have to worry about the weather Tuesday night, when U2 returns to Arrowhead to present its Joshua Tree Tour, which honors the 30th anniversary of the band’s most successful and popular album.

The weather has been kind to Evans’ crew, which started setting up for Tuesday’s show on Friday. By showtime, they will have unloaded and set up 46 truckloads of parts and components.

On Sept. 12, U2 will play at Arrowhead Stadium to commemorate the 30th anniversary of "The Joshua Tree." Here's a look at the massive stage U2 will be performing on. All stage photos from STUFISH.

The weather also did a favor to a group of fans who have camped out in front of Arrowhead since early Sunday. The prize that awaits: a prime spot in general admission on the floor around the stage, where it’s first-come, first-serve.

“This will be my second show of this tour, my 13th U2 show ever,” said Mikey Brown of Dallas, the first in line. “I also saw the show in Pittsburgh. I always get GA (general admission).”

Brown arrived at 6 a.m. Sunday. He sleeps in a nearby hotel, with help from others who keep each other’s place in line.

Tracy Krelle from Omaha, Neb., was sitting with Brown and several other fans.

“This will be my fifth U2 show but my first in GA,” she said. “I saw the show in Chicago in June. We got to see Bono as he was arriving for the show. We were in line and they came over and said hello and shook hands.”

A high-tech, lavishly produced show awaits them inside Arrowhead, a show put together by a traveling crew of 126 people and 1,500 to 1,800 people hired locally, Evans said.

The crown jewel of the show: an 8,000-square-foot video screen. “The resolution is so clear it takes your mind a moment to get used to it,” Evans said. “What people will experience is that no matter where they are in the stadium, they are going to see visuals that they’ve never seen before.”

Timothy Finn: 816-234-4781, @phinnagain

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