The Royals’ George Brett was livid after being called out during the famous pine-tar game in 1983. Brett was restrained by umpire Joe Brinkman after Brett’s bat, held by umpire Tim McClelland, was ruled illegal because of pine tar during the ninth inning of a July 24, 1983, game at Yankee Stadium. Brett had just hit a two-run home run to give the Royals the lead. Royals manager Dick Howser (left) argued on his team’s behalf. A new book by Filip Bondy, “The Pine Tar Game: The Kansas City Royals, the New York Yankees and Baseball’s Most Absurd and Entertaining Controversy,” delves into the fabled game.
The Royals’ George Brett was livid after being called out during the famous pine-tar game in 1983. Brett was restrained by umpire Joe Brinkman after Brett’s bat, held by umpire Tim McClelland, was ruled illegal because of pine tar during the ninth inning of a July 24, 1983, game at Yankee Stadium. Brett had just hit a two-run home run to give the Royals the lead. Royals manager Dick Howser (left) argued on his team’s behalf. A new book by Filip Bondy, “The Pine Tar Game: The Kansas City Royals, the New York Yankees and Baseball’s Most Absurd and Entertaining Controversy,” delves into the fabled game. File photo The Associated Press
The Royals’ George Brett was livid after being called out during the famous pine-tar game in 1983. Brett was restrained by umpire Joe Brinkman after Brett’s bat, held by umpire Tim McClelland, was ruled illegal because of pine tar during the ninth inning of a July 24, 1983, game at Yankee Stadium. Brett had just hit a two-run home run to give the Royals the lead. Royals manager Dick Howser (left) argued on his team’s behalf. A new book by Filip Bondy, “The Pine Tar Game: The Kansas City Royals, the New York Yankees and Baseball’s Most Absurd and Entertaining Controversy,” delves into the fabled game. File photo The Associated Press