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Dr. Drai is a gynecologist. He is not Dr. Dre. A ruling decides they won't be confused

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has ruled that a Pennsylvania gynecologist's trademark of Dr. Drai does not infringe on that of music mogul Dr. Dre, shown here. Consumers won't be confused by the two, the ruling said.
The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has ruled that a Pennsylvania gynecologist's trademark of Dr. Drai does not infringe on that of music mogul Dr. Dre, shown here. Consumers won't be confused by the two, the ruling said. Facebook/Dr. Dre

The trademark battle's over.

In Dr. Dre versus Dr. Drai, the rapper lost, the gynecologist won.

Dr. Dre, whose real name is Andre Young, filed a complaint in 2015 against Pennsylvania OB/GYN Draion M. Burch, who also goes by Dr. Drai.

The real doctor applied to use the "Dr. Drai" trademark for his business purposes - books, videos, podcasts, webinars, motivational speaking services and his medical practice, according to CNN, which referred to the case as an "East Coast/West Coast feud of sorts."

Drai is Burch's nickname, a shortened version of his first name, Draion, used by family, colleagues and patients.

The doctor's website - DrDrai.com - describes him as an “OBGYN & media personality." His books include "20 Things You May Not Know About The Penis" and his newest, "20 Things You May Not Know About The Vagina."

Young tried to block the application, arguing that their names, which are pronounced the same, would confuse people and suggest a false connection between them.

Explained by Forbes, Young argued "that the 'media personality' part of Dr. Drai’s persona would confuse consumers into believing that Dr. Drai's products were connected with Dr. Dre’s 'musical composition and production services due to the entertainment nature of both types of services.'"

You know, like somehow people could confuse Beats with births.

Burch argued, basically, that people wouldn't be confused "because Dr. Dre is not a medical doctor nor is he qualified to provide any type of medical services or sell products specifically in the medical or healthcare industry," Business Insider reported.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office agreed with the man who went to medical school, ruling last week that consumers aren't likely to be confused between the gynecologist and the Grammy winner, or believe "the parties’ goods and services would emanate from the same source.”

Insert mic drop.

"I was just appalled how someone would think that I wanted to be them and I actually went to medical school," Burch said in documents related to the case, according to CNN.

Dr. Dre has offered no comment.

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