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'Lost in Space' fans lust after the sexy robot. 'Y'all need Jesus,' Netflix says

The last thing Netflix anticipated with its "Lost in Space" reboot was that people would fall in love with the robot, or more specifically the robot's hard-as-metal bum.
The last thing Netflix anticipated with its "Lost in Space" reboot was that people would fall in love with the robot, or more specifically the robot's hard-as-metal bum. Twitter

The folks at Netflix seem confused by what's happening with their reboot of the 1960s TV series "Lost in Space."

People are lusting after the robot in the show. More to the point, they love his buns of steel.

"Y'all need Jesus," Netflix cheekily scolded the show's fans this week with a one-minute video.

Like in the old TV show, the Robinson family gets "shipwrecked" on an unknown planet full of aliens.

The robot gets considerable airtime because he and Will Robinson, the youngest family member played by Maxwell Jenkins, are "the heart of the story," Maxwell told Digital Spy. "The relationship between Will and his dad is complicated. His dad wasn't around much when he was a kid.

The Robinson family, part of a highly trained mission to establish a new colony in space, is unexpectedly pulled off course forcing them to crash land on a lost planet. Danger will find them.

"The first time Will meets the robot, he is studying this new alien species, and the robot's curious about this, and that triggers something in Will's mind."

The robot, played by actor Brian Steele, is an alien mechanical android that "has a bit more mystery to it" than Robby the Robot from the TV series. showrunner Zack Estrin told Digital Spy.

The two robots don't even look like each other. Robby, with chubby, coiled legs and no bum to speak of, was about as sexy as an upright vacuum cleaner.

The new robot is "slick, futuristic, and reminiscent of the creatures in Alien and Predator," notes PopSugar.

He's a real hard body.

People have noticed.

The growing attraction to the robot is surprising, writes IndieWire, considering the series is geared toward families. "It turns out the more light-hearted tone has done nothing to prevent the robot from becoming the desire of the internet," it writes.

Danger, Will Robinson. Your robot's on Tinder.

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