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I'm getting too old for this...

06/23/2010 11:54 AM

05/16/2014 5:16 PM

There's been a lot written trying to identify the style of play of the U.S. soccer team.

Well, I'd say their style of play is keeping their fans on the edge of their seats for the entire 90 minutes of each game.

Wow. Wednesday's 1-0 win against Algeria was about all my poor heart could take. Landon Donovan shared a long hug with coach Bob Bradley after the game, and certainly those two gained the most from the United States' victory.

Three minutes from the worst tie in U.S. soccer history, Donovan rescued the American team, his own legacy and Bradley's job.

The golden boy of U.S. soccer was about to head home without having advanced from a group that was as easy as the Americans have ever faced at the World Cup. Then Donovan swooped in and scored the winner in injury time. It's a goal that will be talked about for years to come.

Bradley was a controversial choice as coach after Juergen Klinsmann turned down the job. The naysayers have been on his back since day one, and had the U.S. failed to advance, it's hard to see how Bradley could have saved his job.

But instead of going home with its heads down, the U.S. team won its group for the first time since the first World Cup in 1930.

And they did it in their own way, which is the hard way. Who knows what to expect now. The Americans could face anyone from Group D: Germany, Ghana, Serbia or Australia.

Doesn't matter who they'll face, it should be a good, close game.

In the last year, the U.S. team has beaten Spain, rallied mightily against Slovenia, given Brazil all it could handle and struggled to beat Algeria.

But the U.S. did beat Algeria. And they live on. Let's hear from you, the American fans. Leave your comments below.

| Pete Grathoff, pgrathoff@kcstar.com

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