Red Zone

October 23, 2013

Chiefs’ Schwartz looks forward to facing brother and making NFL history Sunday

Whether it's via text or by phone, Chiefs guard Geoff Schwartz says he and his brother, Cleveland Browns tackle Mitchell Schwartz, communicate every day. But surprisingly, as of Wednesday, Geoff said they hadn't discussed their looming showdown on Sunday, when the Browns will invade Arrowhead Stadium to face the Chiefs at noon.

Red Zone

The Chiefs and NFL by beat writer Terez Paylor

Whether it's via text or by phone, Chiefs guard Geoff Schwartz says he and his brother, Cleveland Browns tackle Mitchell Schwartz, communicate every day.

But surprisingly, as of Wednesday, Geoff said they hadn't discussed their looming showdown on Sunday, when the Browns will invade Arrowhead Stadium to face the Chiefs at noon.

“We talked a little this morning, but it was about something else,” Geoff said. “We haven't really talked about it very much.”

But that doesn't mean it won't be special for the brothers.

“It's exciting, you know?” Geoff said. “When he first came in the NFL, it was something I was looking forward to ... because I like watching him play. It's really neat, especially two brothers, especially us being Jewish, it's never happened before.”

Geoff, 27, and Mitchell, 24, are the first Jewish siblings to play in the NFL since Ralph and Arnold Horween (also known as Horowitz) played for the Bears during 1921-23. But the Horween brothers were teammates, so the Schwartz brothers will be the first Jewish siblings to actually face each other in the NFL.

They've come a long way from when they were teenagers, when Geoff said they didn't start playing football until they were in high school. In fact, Geoff said Mitchell actually had to be convinced to play the sport.

“I think his freshman year and JV, he played quarterback and then eventually he slowly moved to like tight end and eventually offensive line,” Schwartz said. “Once they got him on the field playing quarterback, I think he liked it.”

Now, several years later, their parents will travel to Kansas City from their home in Pacific Palisades, Calif., to watch their sons make a little history.

“Oh yeah, they've got the shirts and everything ready to go,” Schwartz said. “They make those half and half shirts, split down the middle. Half Chiefs and then half Browns.”

Related content

Comments

Videos

Sports Videos