Even without using it, the idea of replay reviews reduces Ned Yost’s stress

03/05/2014 7:10 PM

03/05/2014 7:10 PM

Royals manager Ned Yost felt no call Wednesday to engage his first potential opportunity to utilize baseball’s new replay system.

But he learned something along the way.

This system just may minimize a manager’s stress.

Maybe it won’t be enough to save them from ulcers, but …

“It’s going to save us money,” he said, alluding to fines for being kicked out of games for overzealous protests. “You don’t have to rush out. I learned that today.”

As long as he makes his move before the next pitch, which Yost suggested allowed him plenty of time to wait to hear from his video-replay people in the television truck before getting lathered up.

“Sometimes, we might even get the information before I even step out to decide if I want to go out or not,” he said.

Otherwise, he’ll simply know whether it’s a “good call” and turn around and walk away or whether he wants to appeal it.

As for the time-honored baseball tactic of rushing the field to argue?

“There’s not a need for that anymore,” Yost said.

Well, we’ll see about that.

Not everything is reviewable, of course, and managers are allowed a limited amount of challenges.

Yost had said Tuesday he was looking forward to the first game with the enhanced replay capacity Wednesday at Arizona. But he also said he didn’t intend to just grandstand, either, and he never felt compelled to invoke it.

One play at the plate was close enough for catcher Salvador Perez to protest, but Yost said he and bench coach Don Wakamatsu saw it “really, really well” and determined it was “kind of inconclusive” and thus would have lost the challenge.

The only other play worth mentioning, he said, was Christian Colon being ruled safe at first on a fielder’s choice.

“Of course, we got that call," Yost said, dryly, “so I didn’t feel the need to challenge that.”

Videos

Join the discussion

is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service