Kansas State University

July 2, 2014

Kansas State athletic budget proposed at $65.7 million for 2014-15

Kansas State expects its athletic budget to grow to $65.7 million for the 2015 fiscal year. The projected rise is a $5.65 million increase from the 2014 fiscal year and a $21.6 million increase from the 2010 fiscal year, shortly after John Currie was hired as athletic director, but a $4.8 million drop from the 2013 fiscal year, in which the Wildcats’ operating revenue was nearly $70.5 million.

Kansas State expects its athletic budget to grow to $65.7 million for the 2015 fiscal year.

The projected rise is a $5.65 million increase from the 2014 fiscal year and a $21.6 million increase from the 2010 fiscal year, shortly after John Currie was hired as athletic director, but a $4.8 million drop from the 2013 fiscal year, in which the Wildcats’ operating revenue was nearly $70.5 million.

Currie detailed the projected budget in a letter to fans Wednesday. K-State has operated in the black for five consecutive fiscal years, which run from July 1 to June 30.

“Our largest revenue sources will again be the combined $31.16 million in ticket purchases and contributions by our loyal fans and Ahearn Fund donors,” Currie wrote, “and $26 million in projected Big 12/NCAA revenue shares. Keep in mind that while our Big 12 revenues have doubled since 2009, the grass-roots participation and dedication of our fans and donors is still the largest source of support for K-State student-athletes.”

In the upcoming fiscal year, K-State projects to spend $23 million on team operations and recruiting, $7.6 million on scholarships, $4.9 million on athlete support and $3.4 million on sports administration. The main revenue projections include $26 million from the Big 12 and the NCAA, $16.5 million from donations and $10.8 million from football ticket sales.

One expected expense increase will be found in food. K-State plans to spend 18 percent more, approximately $700,000, on nutritional expenses following new NCAA legislation that allows schools to provide round-the-clock meals and snacks to athletes. Currie said K-State plans on enhancing its snack options by offering fruit and smoothies to athletes at strength training areas.

K-State will also spend more to complete a multi-year plan to eliminate $1.6 million in direct institutional support of the athletic department. By the 2016 fiscal year, Currie projects K-State’s athletic department to run without any financial help from the school.

“We have made tremendous progress over the past five years toward our vision of being a Model Intercollegiate Athletics Program,” Currie wrote, “and there are no plans to slow down.”

To reach Kellis Robinett, send email to krobinett@kcstar.com. Follow him on Twitter @kellisrobinett.

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