Yael T. Abouhalkah

September 20, 2013

Sorry, but Jay Nixon won’t be our next president

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon certainly certainly deserves praise for taking tough stands on not just the gun and tax cut bills but also on a few dozen other measures, most of which the GOP could not override during their veto session. However, Nixon is not cut in the true Democratic mold of being a leader on national causes.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has enjoyed a heady last few weeks.

There was the front-page story in

The New York Times

.

Then came the Democratic governor’s two great victories in the General Assembly, when the supposedly veto-proof Republican majorities could not override his needed vetoes of a

flawed gun bill and of a costly tax cut bill.

The Washington Post

wrote this week about Nixon, throwing out as part of its piece the possibility he could become part of a national presidential/vice presidential ticket as soon as 2016.

And on Friday Nixon was scheduled to accompany President Barack Obama during a visit to Ford’s Claycomo plant.

I’m not always a Nixon fan, although he’s certainly been far better than the Republicans have put forth for governor in the elections he has won. And Nixon certainly deserves praise for taking tough stands on not just the gun and tax cut bills but also on a few dozen other measures, most of which the GOP could not override during their veto session.

However, Nixon is not cut in the true Democratic mold of being a leader on national causes.

He is often seen as holding too tightly to some conservative stances, especially on financial issues, that tend to be favored by a number of tightfisted Missourians.

That kind of stance has helped Nixon win elections in Missouri, especially with swing voters.

But I can’t see how it helps Nixon gain traction with national forces looking for progressive, outspoken elected officials in the Democratic mold of, say, a Hillary Clinton or even Barack Obama.

Bottom line: I don’t see any good reasons to think Jay Nixon is going to be our next (or even a future) vice presidential or presidential candidate.

Nothing wrong with that, by the way. He has three more years to be a solid governor for Missouri, fighting back against the worst forces of the Republican Party and trying his best to get more businesses to locate in the state.

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