Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach (front) emerged Tuesday from the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver after delivering an argument in the legal fight over how the state of Kansas enforces its proof-of-citizenship requirement for voters. The case was before the court after a federal judge in May temporarily blocked Kansas from disenfranchising about 18,000 who registered to vote at motor vehicle offices without providing citizenship paperwork.
Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach (front) emerged Tuesday from the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver after delivering an argument in the legal fight over how the state of Kansas enforces its proof-of-citizenship requirement for voters. The case was before the court after a federal judge in May temporarily blocked Kansas from disenfranchising about 18,000 who registered to vote at motor vehicle offices without providing citizenship paperwork. David Zalubowski The Associated Press
Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach (front) emerged Tuesday from the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver after delivering an argument in the legal fight over how the state of Kansas enforces its proof-of-citizenship requirement for voters. The case was before the court after a federal judge in May temporarily blocked Kansas from disenfranchising about 18,000 who registered to vote at motor vehicle offices without providing citizenship paperwork. David Zalubowski The Associated Press

Mary Sanchez

August 24, 2016 6:57 PM

Why outcome of Kansas voter ID law case is crucial for our country’s future

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