A photo of Jessica Ghawi, who was killed in the 2012 Aurora movie theater massacre, sits in a display easel following a news conference. Ghawi was 24 and had moved to Colorado in 2011. She had survived a shooting at a Toronto mall just a few weeks before she was killed in Aurora. She had posted on a blog that the experience had shown her “how fragile life was.”
A photo of Jessica Ghawi, who was killed in the 2012 Aurora movie theater massacre, sits in a display easel following a news conference. Ghawi was 24 and had moved to Colorado in 2011. She had survived a shooting at a Toronto mall just a few weeks before she was killed in Aurora. She had posted on a blog that the experience had shown her “how fragile life was.” Brennan Linsley AP
A photo of Jessica Ghawi, who was killed in the 2012 Aurora movie theater massacre, sits in a display easel following a news conference. Ghawi was 24 and had moved to Colorado in 2011. She had survived a shooting at a Toronto mall just a few weeks before she was killed in Aurora. She had posted on a blog that the experience had shown her “how fragile life was.” Brennan Linsley AP

Don’t pity them, vote: How these parents are pushing gun reforms through grief, honesty

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    "I sat outside my home and listened to my sister scream for help," wrote Kayla Perez, 21, of Overland Park, who is the author of the first story in a new book, "Welcome to My Neighborhood." It is framed as a children's book, similar to Golden Books, but the stories are true, dire and grim. They're written by teenagers in the Youth Ambassador program, including Perez, who penned her story when she was 17 years old and living under the same roof as a crack addict her mother had married. The book, a pro bono project of the advertising and marketing company VML, will be introduced to Kansas City civic leaders at a dinner Tuesday. The Youth Ambassador program promotes youth development and addresses social and academic challenges for underserved teenagers.