A photo of Jessica Ghawi, who was killed in the 2012 Aurora movie theater massacre, sits in a display easel following a news conference. Ghawi was 24 and had moved to Colorado in 2011. She had survived a shooting at a Toronto mall just a few weeks before she was killed in Aurora. She had posted on a blog that the experience had shown her “how fragile life was.”
A photo of Jessica Ghawi, who was killed in the 2012 Aurora movie theater massacre, sits in a display easel following a news conference. Ghawi was 24 and had moved to Colorado in 2011. She had survived a shooting at a Toronto mall just a few weeks before she was killed in Aurora. She had posted on a blog that the experience had shown her “how fragile life was.” Brennan Linsley AP
A photo of Jessica Ghawi, who was killed in the 2012 Aurora movie theater massacre, sits in a display easel following a news conference. Ghawi was 24 and had moved to Colorado in 2011. She had survived a shooting at a Toronto mall just a few weeks before she was killed in Aurora. She had posted on a blog that the experience had shown her “how fragile life was.” Brennan Linsley AP

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