Melissa Carter, center, chats with her son William, 13, before joining her fiance Addullah Salahuddin, right, at the computer to prepare they wedding music playlist in New York. Carter, an ex-offender who was diagnosed with HIV in 1994, met Salahuddin while both were in separate ex-offender program at Fortune Society. Her success made it possible to reconnect with her children and study for an online degree. A new U.N. study shows the U.S. lagging behind other developed nation in HIV/AIDS awareness and treatment. African Americans are disproportionately affected.
Melissa Carter, center, chats with her son William, 13, before joining her fiance Addullah Salahuddin, right, at the computer to prepare they wedding music playlist in New York. Carter, an ex-offender who was diagnosed with HIV in 1994, met Salahuddin while both were in separate ex-offender program at Fortune Society. Her success made it possible to reconnect with her children and study for an online degree. A new U.N. study shows the U.S. lagging behind other developed nation in HIV/AIDS awareness and treatment. African Americans are disproportionately affected. Bebeto Matthews The Associated Press
Melissa Carter, center, chats with her son William, 13, before joining her fiance Addullah Salahuddin, right, at the computer to prepare they wedding music playlist in New York. Carter, an ex-offender who was diagnosed with HIV in 1994, met Salahuddin while both were in separate ex-offender program at Fortune Society. Her success made it possible to reconnect with her children and study for an online degree. A new U.N. study shows the U.S. lagging behind other developed nation in HIV/AIDS awareness and treatment. African Americans are disproportionately affected. Bebeto Matthews The Associated Press

Racial disparity likely behind U.S. poor results in global AIDS fight

July 17, 2014 11:29 AM

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