Lewis Diuguid

January 2, 2014

Colorado marijuana could create headaches for neighboring states

The liberalization of weed in Colorado will cause a lot of headaches for authorities in neighboring states. Missouri and Kansas law enforcement authorities will have to be on their toes now that Colorado shops are legally selling marijuana for recreational use. Penalties for being caught with Colorado grass also may have to be re-evaluated.

A ton of college students from the University of Missouri-Columbia in the 1970s used to pile into whoever had the most roadworthy car and dash to Colorado mostly on weekends for as many cases of Coors as the vehicle could hold.

The legal drinking age in Colorado was 18 back then, which was a bonanza to beer-guzzling college students in Missouri who loved to boast that they were within the law to buy beer — at least in Colorado. Bringing it back to campus, not so much.

But that never stopped the frequent Colorado beer runs to keep the dorm and frat house refrigerators well stocked. Most of the time, authorities looked the other way.

But authorities in Missouri and Kansas need to be more concerned now about Colorado shops being open to legally sell marijuana for recreational use. That may require law enforcement officers to have different drug detection equipment.

Penalties for being caught with Colorado grass also may have to be re-evaluated. The liberalization of weed in Colorado will cause a lot of headaches for authorities in neighboring states.

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