Lewis Diuguid

September 6, 2013

E-cigarette use among teens is a growing health concern

Wells Fargo Securities said people in this country will spend $1.7 billion on electronic cigarettes this year. That is not a good trend especially as the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, starts to ramp up to try to pull health care costs down.

Smoking cigarettes has always been considered a thing that cool kids did.

Health concerns such as cancer, diabetes, and heart and lung disease helped dampened young people’s urge to join the puffing crowd. But e-cigarettes now appear to be enticing more kids into smoking.

In 2012, one in 10 U.S. high school students and about 3 percent of middle school kids have used e-cigarettes, the Los Angeles Times reports. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Youth Tobacco Survey found that 1.8 million middle and high school students said they had tried the nicotine delivery system.

E-cigarettes include such flavors as chocolate and mint, which make them more appealing to kids. Health officials are concerned that this new kind of puffing will set kids on a road to a lifelong addiction and health problems.

Wells Fargo Securities said people in this country will spend $1.7 billion on e-cigarettes this year. That is not a good trend especially as the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, starts to ramp up to try to pull health care costs down.

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