Lewis Diuguid

September 4, 2013

Limestone caves as mass bomb shelters date to Cold War era

Limestone caves as bomb shelters are nothing new. Until the Cold War ended more than 20 years ago, the many limestone caves surrounding the Kansas City area were its population’s ticket to survival if a nuclear war were ever to have occurred.

Until the Cold War ended more than 20 years ago, the many limestone caves surrounding the Kansas City area were its population’s ticket to survival if a nuclear war were ever to have occurred.

That threat largely evaporated with the end of the Soviet Union. The caves, created by the mining of limestone for construction, continue to be used as warehouse, manufacturing and office space.

It makes little sense for anyone to buy space for about $25,000 at an recreational vehicle survival shelter about 50 miles north of Kansas City in Atchison, Kan. Yet, an entrepreneur is selling his Vivos Survival Shelter and Resort to about 5,000 members, The Kansas City Star reports.

During the Cold War, companies sold people backyard bomb shelters for use to ride out any nuclear blast that might occur and the devastating aftermath. If yesterday’s entrepreneurs made a living off of people’s fears, then today’s business folks certainly have a shot at it, too.

As a Russian comedian often said, “What a country?!!”

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