Lewis Diuguid

August 30, 2013

Obamacare myth debunked

It seems that the greatest concern that Republicans have about President Barack Obama’s signature Affordable Care Act is that it will be wildly successful, and the people will love it. Rand Corp. researchers have found that predictions of spikes in health insurance premiums under the law aren’t true.

It seems that the greatest concern that Republicans have about President Barack Obama’s signature Affordable Care Act is that it will be wildly successful, and the people will love it.

That appears to be behind their message that Obamacare is bad for the country and Republicans’ repeated, though fruitless, efforts in the House to repeal the legislation. But their efforts do serve the purpose of confusing the public.

Many people truly believe that getting health insurance coverage for 30 million more Americans is a bad thing because that has been the message from the conservative media and politicians. They have convinced folks that it will be too costly, too.

But Rand Corp. researchers have found that predictions of spikes in health insurance premiums under the Affordable Care Act aren’t true. Most states will see little or no change.

Out of pocket premiums for most folks who get health care plans through new insurance exchanges will drop because of federal subsidies. USA Today said average premiums for equal plans would cost $5,837 with Obamacare in effect and $6,192 without it, a $355 savings under the Affordable Care Act, according to the report. Workers at businesses with fewer than 100 workers could expect pay almost 6 percent less in premiums in 2016 than without the health care reform law.

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