A bee flies back to a swarm in an oak tree in Salina, Kan. New honeybee colonies are formed when a queen bee leaves a colony with many worker bees. Spring is when swarming usually occurs but can happen any time during the producing season. During that spring migration, the old queen and her thousands of worker bees search for new suitable nesting places to begin new colonies. Periodically, they will stop to rest, often in places occupied by humans. The swarm will meld together, surrounding and protecting the queen bee.
A bee flies back to a swarm in an oak tree in Salina, Kan. New honeybee colonies are formed when a queen bee leaves a colony with many worker bees. Spring is when swarming usually occurs but can happen any time during the producing season. During that spring migration, the old queen and her thousands of worker bees search for new suitable nesting places to begin new colonies. Periodically, they will stop to rest, often in places occupied by humans. The swarm will meld together, surrounding and protecting the queen bee. Tom Dorsey The Associated Press
A bee flies back to a swarm in an oak tree in Salina, Kan. New honeybee colonies are formed when a queen bee leaves a colony with many worker bees. Spring is when swarming usually occurs but can happen any time during the producing season. During that spring migration, the old queen and her thousands of worker bees search for new suitable nesting places to begin new colonies. Periodically, they will stop to rest, often in places occupied by humans. The swarm will meld together, surrounding and protecting the queen bee. Tom Dorsey The Associated Press

Continuing deaths of honeybees threaten crop production in U.S.

May 14, 2015 01:23 PM