This undated file image provided by Merck & Co., shows a cross section of a normal brain, right, and one of a brain damaged by advanced Alzheimer's disease. A dramatic shift is beginning in the disappointing struggle to find something to slow the damage of Alzheimer's disease: The first U.S. experiments with “brain pacemakers” for Alzheimer's are getting underway. Scientists are looking beyond drugs to implants in the hunt for much-needed new treatments. There is no known cause or cure for Alzheimer’s disease.
This undated file image provided by Merck & Co., shows a cross section of a normal brain, right, and one of a brain damaged by advanced Alzheimer's disease. A dramatic shift is beginning in the disappointing struggle to find something to slow the damage of Alzheimer's disease: The first U.S. experiments with “brain pacemakers” for Alzheimer's are getting underway. Scientists are looking beyond drugs to implants in the hunt for much-needed new treatments. There is no known cause or cure for Alzheimer’s disease. File photo The Associated Press
This undated file image provided by Merck & Co., shows a cross section of a normal brain, right, and one of a brain damaged by advanced Alzheimer's disease. A dramatic shift is beginning in the disappointing struggle to find something to slow the damage of Alzheimer's disease: The first U.S. experiments with “brain pacemakers” for Alzheimer's are getting underway. Scientists are looking beyond drugs to implants in the hunt for much-needed new treatments. There is no known cause or cure for Alzheimer’s disease. File photo The Associated Press

Disparity in alerting people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease alarming

March 25, 2015 01:50 PM

UPDATED March 25, 2015 06:49 PM

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