Opinion

Editorials

Pedal faster to finish new bike lanes in Kansas City

Kansas City needs to move more aggressively to complete its plan to restripe Grand Boulevard. That would reduce the number of traffic lanes from four to three and add dedicated bike lanes on each side of the street. It’s also disappointing that City Hall has not made enough headway in completing the other parts of the BikeKC Downtown Loop and Neighborhood Connector.

Mary Sanchez

GOP beware: Nobody puts The Donald in a corner

Donald Trump is not likely to take a quiet exit from either the upcoming GOP debate or his bid for the nomination. But unless Republicans want to all but seal the White House for a second Clinton, they’d better get a game plan quick to usher him out.

Questions remain about Ryan Stokes’ chaotic last night

Things had turned a bit chaotic outside the Power & Light District when a camera on a Kansas City police car recorded 24-year-old Ryan Stokes running across Grand Boulevard. He was one of a group of young people moving away from a spot where an officer had deployed pepper spray to break up an altercation. Within two minutes, Stokes would be fatally wounded by a police officer.

The Monday Poll: GOP debate in the spotlight

It’s nearly time. The first debate in the crowded GOP presidential primary is Thursday in Cleveland, and controversy swirls around which of the 17 candidates will make it to the stage. Tell us what you think.

Questions remain about Ryan Stokes’ chaotic last night

Things had turned a bit chaotic outside the Power & Light District when a camera on a Kansas City police car recorded 24-year-old Ryan Stokes running across Grand Boulevard. He was one of a group of young people moving away from a spot where an officer had deployed pepper spray to break up an altercation. Within two minutes, Stokes would be fatally wounded by a police officer.

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Leonard Pitts Jr.: Hey, Dylann Roof, we’ve already had a race war

That was what authorities say white supremacist Dylann Roof had in mind when he shot up a storied African-American church in June. It might have surprised him to learn that we’ve already had a race war. That’s not how one typically thinks of World War II, but it takes only a cursory consideration of that war’s causes and effects to make the case.

Leonard Pitts Jr.: Hey, Dylann Roof, we’ve already had a race war

That was what authorities say white supremacist Dylann Roof had in mind when he shot up a storied African-American church in June. It might have surprised him to learn that we’ve already had a race war. That’s not how one typically thinks of World War II, but it takes only a cursory consideration of that war’s causes and effects to make the case.

GOP beware: Nobody puts The Donald in a corner

Donald Trump is not likely to take a quiet exit from either the upcoming GOP debate or his bid for the nomination. But unless Republicans want to all but seal the White House for a second Clinton, they’d better get a game plan quick to usher him out.

Kansas City Deals

Today's Circulars

Gov. Sam Brownback’s war on the courts will be historic

My friend Mike Shanin, who moderates the KCPT program “Ruckus,” said on air that my recent contention that “Orval Faubus would feel at home in Kansas” was outrageous. Not so, Mike. Faubus and his successor ilk are alive and well in Kansas.

Ike Uri: Climate change is a moral concern

The U.S. is saturated with arguments over the existence and cause of global warming, though the science on the subject has long been settled. The time has come for rhetoric on climate change to become more ethically and socially grounded.

John G. Carney: How do we prepare for the realities of dying?

John G. Carney, president and CEO of the Center for Practical Bioethics in Kansas City, writes: 75 percent of Americans claim that preparing a living will and appointing a health care proxy are critically important. Yet fewer than one-third of us do anything to make it happen.

Gov. Sam Brownback’s war on the courts will be historic

My friend Mike Shanin, who moderates the KCPT program “Ruckus,” said on air that my recent contention that “Orval Faubus would feel at home in Kansas” was outrageous. Not so, Mike. Faubus and his successor ilk are alive and well in Kansas.

Ike Uri: Climate change is a moral concern

The U.S. is saturated with arguments over the existence and cause of global warming, though the science on the subject has long been settled. The time has come for rhetoric on climate change to become more ethically and socially grounded.

John G. Carney: How do we prepare for the realities of dying?

John G. Carney, president and CEO of the Center for Practical Bioethics in Kansas City, writes: 75 percent of Americans claim that preparing a living will and appointing a health care proxy are critically important. Yet fewer than one-third of us do anything to make it happen.

Opinion

Barbara Shelly

Questions remain about Ryan Stokes’ chaotic last night

Things had turned a bit chaotic outside the Power & Light District when a camera on a Kansas City police car recorded 24-year-old Ryan Stokes running across Grand Boulevard. He was one of a group of young people moving away from a spot where an officer had deployed pepper spray to break up an altercation. Within two minutes, Stokes would be fatally wounded by a police officer.

Editorials

National Museum of Toys and Miniatures in Kansas City is a joyfully renovated shrine to playthings

When visitors return to the National Museum of Toys and Miniatures on Saturday, they will discover what a difference a yearlong renovation and an $11 million capital campaign can make. With a bright and fresh new layout and a wholly transformed exhibit strategy, the museum, at 52nd and Oak streets, can now make a justifiable claim as an essential destination for locals and visitors alike.