Editorials

Overland Park project seeking $610 million in taxpayer money requires much more scrutiny

Crucial questions must be answered before any decisions are made to approve a $610 million taxpayer subsidy for a mixed-use project on the site of Brookridge Golf and Fitness in south Overland Park. Council members and the city staff have the ability to protect taxpayers if an unwise investment is being proposed. State officials will be responsible for making sure Kansas tax dollars aren’t wasted on the project.

Barbara Shelly

Sorry, Kevin Yoder: Your measure really is about helping the big banks

Ever since he was named last week as the sponsor of a controversial measure rolling back a significant financial reform, U.S. Rep. Kevin Yoder has been trying to have it both ways. He wants constituents to think his motives were all about helping out community banks and farmers. But the biggest beneficiaries of his action are the Wall Street banks, which already have rewarded Yoder handsomely and will continue to do so.

Twists and turns occur in Kansas City’s naming rights game

Kansas City likes to name buildings, streets, parks, libraries and other public amenities after local politicians and civic leaders. Almost all governments participate in this naming rights game. It can make great sense when it rewards people for their services to the community or for their achievements in certain professions. But this process also can be flawed, leading to some oddities.

Sorry, Kevin Yoder: Your measure really is about helping the big banks

Ever since he was named last week as the sponsor of a controversial measure rolling back a significant financial reform, U.S. Rep. Kevin Yoder has been trying to have it both ways. He wants constituents to think his motives were all about helping out community banks and farmers. But the biggest beneficiaries of his action are the Wall Street banks, which already have rewarded Yoder handsomely and will continue to do so.

Twists and turns occur in Kansas City’s naming rights game

Kansas City likes to name buildings, streets, parks, libraries and other public amenities after local politicians and civic leaders. Almost all governments participate in this naming rights game. It can make great sense when it rewards people for their services to the community or for their achievements in certain professions. But this process also can be flawed, leading to some oddities.

Sorry, Kevin Yoder: Your measure really is about helping the big banks

Ever since he was named last week as the sponsor of a controversial measure rolling back a significant financial reform, U.S. Rep. Kevin Yoder has been trying to have it both ways. He wants constituents to think his motives were all about helping out community banks and farmers. But the biggest beneficiaries of his action are the Wall Street banks, which already have rewarded Yoder handsomely and will continue to do so.

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Michael Gerson: Vaccine alliance benefits grow and needs shrink

In the category of stunning, heartening, woefully underreported good news: In 2000, an estimated 9.9 million children around the world died before age 5. In 2013, the figure was 6.3 million. That is 3.6 million fewer deaths, even as the population increased by about 1 billion.

Michael Gerson: Vaccine alliance benefits grow and needs shrink

In the category of stunning, heartening, woefully underreported good news: In 2000, an estimated 9.9 million children around the world died before age 5. In 2013, the figure was 6.3 million. That is 3.6 million fewer deaths, even as the population increased by about 1 billion.

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Today's Circulars

Here’s what fiscal pain in Kansas will look like

If Kansas were a family, it would be as if, to deal with the shortfall, the family invaded its college fund, its retirement fund and its savings account, then mortgaged the house to the hilt. Then the family decided to endure a slight sacrifice by cutting a small part of its expenses by 4 percent.

Jim Strahle: Weapons force difficult decisions for police officers

Jim Strahle, a civilian in the Kansas City Police Department’s media relations office until his retirement last year, writes: A comment quoted by followers of the fatal shooting of 12-year-old Tamir Rice was officers only gave him a two-second warning before firing their weapons. However, one obvious question comes to mind: How long does it take a person holding a pistol in his hand to point it at an officer?

Here’s what fiscal pain in Kansas will look like

If Kansas were a family, it would be as if, to deal with the shortfall, the family invaded its college fund, its retirement fund and its savings account, then mortgaged the house to the hilt. Then the family decided to endure a slight sacrifice by cutting a small part of its expenses by 4 percent.

Jim Strahle: Weapons force difficult decisions for police officers

Jim Strahle, a civilian in the Kansas City Police Department’s media relations office until his retirement last year, writes: A comment quoted by followers of the fatal shooting of 12-year-old Tamir Rice was officers only gave him a two-second warning before firing their weapons. However, one obvious question comes to mind: How long does it take a person holding a pistol in his hand to point it at an officer?

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Yael T. Abouhalkah

Twists and turns occur in Kansas City’s naming rights game

Kansas City likes to name buildings, streets, parks, libraries and other public amenities after local politicians and civic leaders. Almost all governments participate in this naming rights game. It can make great sense when it rewards people for their services to the community or for their achievements in certain professions. But this process also can be flawed, leading to some oddities.