David Millar walked home with a youngster from a basketball court in Elohim City. Millar acknowledged that some extremists have passed their way over the years. “Some of them sort of had radical issues,” he said, “but they were just wanting to get away from that radical life. We’re sad we didn’t help them enough to keep them away from that.”
David Millar walked home with a youngster from a basketball court in Elohim City. Millar acknowledged that some extremists have passed their way over the years. “Some of them sort of had radical issues,” he said, “but they were just wanting to get away from that radical life. We’re sad we didn’t help them enough to keep them away from that.” Keith Myers The Kansas City Star
David Millar walked home with a youngster from a basketball court in Elohim City. Millar acknowledged that some extremists have passed their way over the years. “Some of them sort of had radical issues,” he said, “but they were just wanting to get away from that radical life. We’re sad we didn’t help them enough to keep them away from that.” Keith Myers The Kansas City Star

Little has changed at Elohim City, including the beliefs of the residents

April 24, 2015 12:34 AM

UPDATED April 25, 2015 12:00 PM

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