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Uber and Lyft riders share their safety tips for holiday ride-sharing 2:25

Uber and Lyft riders share their safety tips for holiday ride-sharing

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Watch: ‘Check that driver’s window and make sure nobody’s inside’

KU’s 19 three-pointers sets new school record 3:44

KU’s 19 three-pointers sets new school record

Viral video of K-9 doing push-ups with  police officers 0:42

Viral video of K-9 doing push-ups with police officers

Timeline of Michael Porter Jr.'s brief start at Mizzou 0:44

Timeline of Michael Porter Jr.'s brief start at Mizzou

Watch: Burglar breaks out window at Waldo Jewelers 0:17

Watch: Burglar breaks out window at Waldo Jewelers

Is Jolie Justus the KC mayor's pick for his replacement? 1:47

Is Jolie Justus the KC mayor's pick for his replacement?

KU’s Devonte’ Graham on moving the ball around 1:08

KU’s Devonte’ Graham on moving the ball around

Watch: Zookeeper feeds king penguin chick by hand 2:20

Watch: Zookeeper feeds king penguin chick by hand

KU Cancer Center director named 2017 Kansas Citian of the Year 1:55

KU Cancer Center director named 2017 Kansas Citian of the Year

  • Fighting terrorism and Islamophobia at the grassroots level

    Following terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino in 2015, Dr. Rushdi Abdul Cader cancelled his family's vacation to focus on his grassroots educational program called Anti-V.I.R.U.S.(Anti-Violent Ideology Recruitment in the U.S.) to help combat anti-Muslim sentiment around the country. The self-funded program aims to differentiate Islamic beliefs from terrorist ideology while discrediting the aggressive recruitment efforts by extremist groups like ISIS.

Following terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino in 2015, Dr. Rushdi Abdul Cader cancelled his family's vacation to focus on his grassroots educational program called Anti-V.I.R.U.S.(Anti-Violent Ideology Recruitment in the U.S.) to help combat anti-Muslim sentiment around the country. The self-funded program aims to differentiate Islamic beliefs from terrorist ideology while discrediting the aggressive recruitment efforts by extremist groups like ISIS. Jessica Koscielniak McClatchy
Following terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino in 2015, Dr. Rushdi Abdul Cader cancelled his family's vacation to focus on his grassroots educational program called Anti-V.I.R.U.S.(Anti-Violent Ideology Recruitment in the U.S.) to help combat anti-Muslim sentiment around the country. The self-funded program aims to differentiate Islamic beliefs from terrorist ideology while discrediting the aggressive recruitment efforts by extremist groups like ISIS. Jessica Koscielniak McClatchy

FBI hate-crime report sees 67% surge in attacks on Muslims

November 14, 2016 03:37 PM

UPDATED November 15, 2016 09:22 AM

More Videos

Uber and Lyft riders share their safety tips for holiday ride-sharing 2:25

Uber and Lyft riders share their safety tips for holiday ride-sharing

 Watch: ‘Check that driver’s window and make sure nobody’s inside’ 2:30

Watch: ‘Check that driver’s window and make sure nobody’s inside’

KU’s 19 three-pointers sets new school record 3:44

KU’s 19 three-pointers sets new school record

Viral video of K-9 doing push-ups with  police officers 0:42

Viral video of K-9 doing push-ups with police officers

Timeline of Michael Porter Jr.'s brief start at Mizzou 0:44

Timeline of Michael Porter Jr.'s brief start at Mizzou

Watch: Burglar breaks out window at Waldo Jewelers 0:17

Watch: Burglar breaks out window at Waldo Jewelers

Is Jolie Justus the KC mayor's pick for his replacement? 1:47

Is Jolie Justus the KC mayor's pick for his replacement?

KU’s Devonte’ Graham on moving the ball around 1:08

KU’s Devonte’ Graham on moving the ball around

Watch: Zookeeper feeds king penguin chick by hand 2:20

Watch: Zookeeper feeds king penguin chick by hand

KU Cancer Center director named 2017 Kansas Citian of the Year 1:55

KU Cancer Center director named 2017 Kansas Citian of the Year

  • Voters approve one-eighth-cent sales tax for inner-city improvements

    Supporters of a proposed 1/8-cent sales tax for economic development efforts in central Kansas City gathered on Tuesday to watch voting results at Freedom Inc.’s headquarters. Kansas City voters approved the tax that is estimated to raise $8.6 million a year for 10 years to help economic development in the city’s central core.