Like many convenience stores, the Quik Trip at 4005 Little Blue Parkway in Independence, Missouri, has added kitchens to serve toasted sandwiches, breakfast items, smoothies and made-to-order pizzas. New rules proposed by the federal government could bar such stores from accepting food stamps if more than 15 percent of their total food sales come from items heated on site.
Like many convenience stores, the Quik Trip at 4005 Little Blue Parkway in Independence, Missouri, has added kitchens to serve toasted sandwiches, breakfast items, smoothies and made-to-order pizzas. New rules proposed by the federal government could bar such stores from accepting food stamps if more than 15 percent of their total food sales come from items heated on site. Allison Long The Kansas City Star
Like many convenience stores, the Quik Trip at 4005 Little Blue Parkway in Independence, Missouri, has added kitchens to serve toasted sandwiches, breakfast items, smoothies and made-to-order pizzas. New rules proposed by the federal government could bar such stores from accepting food stamps if more than 15 percent of their total food sales come from items heated on site. Allison Long The Kansas City Star

Push for healthier food could push some stores off food stamp program

August 15, 2016 4:03 PM