FILE - In this Tuesday, April 29, 2014 file photo, a Supreme Court visitor takes pictures with her cell phone outside the Supreme Court in Washington, during a hearing to consider whether police may search cell phones found on people they arrest without first getting a warrant. The Supreme Court ruling barring police from searching cell phones without a warrant had an immediate impact as police nationwide were briefed during roll calls, new procedures were issued and prosecutors discussed the potential impact to possibly thousands of pending court cases. From Los Angeles to New York, and in San Diego, Chicago and Houston, departments met to discuss the unanimous ruling issued Wednesday, June 25, 2014, that prohibits law enforcement from searching an arrestees’ cell phone without a warrant unless a person’s safety or life may be in danger and could make it harder for officers to quickly find incriminating evidence.
FILE - In this Tuesday, April 29, 2014 file photo, a Supreme Court visitor takes pictures with her cell phone outside the Supreme Court in Washington, during a hearing to consider whether police may search cell phones found on people they arrest without first getting a warrant. The Supreme Court ruling barring police from searching cell phones without a warrant had an immediate impact as police nationwide were briefed during roll calls, new procedures were issued and prosecutors discussed the potential impact to possibly thousands of pending court cases. From Los Angeles to New York, and in San Diego, Chicago and Houston, departments met to discuss the unanimous ruling issued Wednesday, June 25, 2014, that prohibits law enforcement from searching an arrestees’ cell phone without a warrant unless a person’s safety or life may be in danger and could make it harder for officers to quickly find incriminating evidence. Jose Luis Magana AP
FILE - In this Tuesday, April 29, 2014 file photo, a Supreme Court visitor takes pictures with her cell phone outside the Supreme Court in Washington, during a hearing to consider whether police may search cell phones found on people they arrest without first getting a warrant. The Supreme Court ruling barring police from searching cell phones without a warrant had an immediate impact as police nationwide were briefed during roll calls, new procedures were issued and prosecutors discussed the potential impact to possibly thousands of pending court cases. From Los Angeles to New York, and in San Diego, Chicago and Houston, departments met to discuss the unanimous ruling issued Wednesday, June 25, 2014, that prohibits law enforcement from searching an arrestees’ cell phone without a warrant unless a person’s safety or life may be in danger and could make it harder for officers to quickly find incriminating evidence. Jose Luis Magana AP

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