For nearly four decades, Don Wistuba has been running a snack shop inside the Kansas Capitol in Topeka. But hit by a double-whammy, the 59-year-old, who has been blind since birth, says he can’t keep the shop open. “Now lobbyists bring food,” he said. “House and Senate members can get in line and get a plate of food for free. I can’t compete.” In addition, many of the state offices that used to be in the Capitol have been moved to other buildings, greatly reducing his customer base.
For nearly four decades, Don Wistuba has been running a snack shop inside the Kansas Capitol in Topeka. But hit by a double-whammy, the 59-year-old, who has been blind since birth, says he can’t keep the shop open. “Now lobbyists bring food,” he said. “House and Senate members can get in line and get a plate of food for free. I can’t compete.” In addition, many of the state offices that used to be in the Capitol have been moved to other buildings, greatly reducing his customer base. Edward M. Eveld eeveld@kcstar.com
For nearly four decades, Don Wistuba has been running a snack shop inside the Kansas Capitol in Topeka. But hit by a double-whammy, the 59-year-old, who has been blind since birth, says he can’t keep the shop open. “Now lobbyists bring food,” he said. “House and Senate members can get in line and get a plate of food for free. I can’t compete.” In addition, many of the state offices that used to be in the Capitol have been moved to other buildings, greatly reducing his customer base. Edward M. Eveld eeveld@kcstar.com

Blind snack shop operator inside the Kansas Capitol doesn’t want to say goodbye

August 13, 2015 11:22 AM