Complaining about the accuracy of public opinion surveys is an old habit. But many campaign experts and academics think cellphones and a reluctant public have combined to cast new, deepening shadows over the tools they use to understand what the nation wants.
Complaining about the accuracy of public opinion surveys is an old habit. But many campaign experts and academics think cellphones and a reluctant public have combined to cast new, deepening shadows over the tools they use to understand what the nation wants. Photo illustration by Neil Nakahodo The Kansas City Star
Complaining about the accuracy of public opinion surveys is an old habit. But many campaign experts and academics think cellphones and a reluctant public have combined to cast new, deepening shadows over the tools they use to understand what the nation wants. Photo illustration by Neil Nakahodo The Kansas City Star

In a culture deeply dependent on surveys, accurate polling gets more elusive

August 01, 2015 05:50 PM

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