As consumers increasingly grow concerned about what’s in their food — from antibiotics and hormones to additives and trans fats — pressure is mounting on the food industry and producers to be more transparent. Many companies advertise their food as “Non-GMO” through the Non-GMO Project, a private nonprofit group started by retailers.
As consumers increasingly grow concerned about what’s in their food — from antibiotics and hormones to additives and trans fats — pressure is mounting on the food industry and producers to be more transparent. Many companies advertise their food as “Non-GMO” through the Non-GMO Project, a private nonprofit group started by retailers. File photo by RANDALL BENTON The Sacramento (Calif.) Bee
As consumers increasingly grow concerned about what’s in their food — from antibiotics and hormones to additives and trans fats — pressure is mounting on the food industry and producers to be more transparent. Many companies advertise their food as “Non-GMO” through the Non-GMO Project, a private nonprofit group started by retailers. File photo by RANDALL BENTON The Sacramento (Calif.) Bee

Congress, consumers battle over whether to label foods containing GMOs

July 06, 2015 04:36 PM

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