As consumers increasingly grow concerned about what’s in their food — from antibiotics and hormones to additives and trans fats — pressure is mounting on the food industry and producers to be more transparent. Many companies advertise their food as “Non-GMO” through the Non-GMO Project, a private nonprofit group started by retailers.
As consumers increasingly grow concerned about what’s in their food — from antibiotics and hormones to additives and trans fats — pressure is mounting on the food industry and producers to be more transparent. Many companies advertise their food as “Non-GMO” through the Non-GMO Project, a private nonprofit group started by retailers. File photo by RANDALL BENTON The Sacramento (Calif.) Bee
As consumers increasingly grow concerned about what’s in their food — from antibiotics and hormones to additives and trans fats — pressure is mounting on the food industry and producers to be more transparent. Many companies advertise their food as “Non-GMO” through the Non-GMO Project, a private nonprofit group started by retailers. File photo by RANDALL BENTON The Sacramento (Calif.) Bee

Congress, consumers battle over whether to label foods containing GMOs

July 06, 2015 4:36 PM

More Videos

  • Jackson County's change in assessing Country Club Plaza shorts KC schools

    The Country Club Plaza sold for $660 million nearly two years ago. The Jackson County assessor’s office set its value -- minus intangibles, such as the Plaza brand, and other non-real estate variables -- at $375 million. Yet the shopping district’s 26 properties are now on the tax rolls at $145 million. The owner, Country Club Plaza JV LLC, won its protest of the higher value by claiming the increase was unfair because the values of neighboring properties went up by lower percentages in the 2017 countywide reassessment.