As the inauguration nears, President-elect Donald Trump has shown no signs of curbing his willingness to criticize brands that draw his ire, as Boeing, Vanity Fair and Lockheed Martin have realized in recent weeks. The spontaneity of his denunciations — and the speed at which his words travel, particularly on Twitter — has created a sense of unease among marketing executives, who now must be prepared in case Trump’s insults fly in their direction.
As the inauguration nears, President-elect Donald Trump has shown no signs of curbing his willingness to criticize brands that draw his ire, as Boeing, Vanity Fair and Lockheed Martin have realized in recent weeks. The spontaneity of his denunciations — and the speed at which his words travel, particularly on Twitter — has created a sense of unease among marketing executives, who now must be prepared in case Trump’s insults fly in their direction. File photo by Josh Haner The New York Times
As the inauguration nears, President-elect Donald Trump has shown no signs of curbing his willingness to criticize brands that draw his ire, as Boeing, Vanity Fair and Lockheed Martin have realized in recent weeks. The spontaneity of his denunciations — and the speed at which his words travel, particularly on Twitter — has created a sense of unease among marketing executives, who now must be prepared in case Trump’s insults fly in their direction. File photo by Josh Haner The New York Times

Be prepared for attacks from Donald Trump, brand experts warn companies

December 26, 2016 06:49 PM