More Videos

New DCF secretary wants transparency, changes for children 3:57

New DCF secretary wants transparency, changes for children

To Chiefs center Mitch Morse, his brother is just a regular dude 7:09

To Chiefs center Mitch Morse, his brother is just a regular dude

Crowds, discounts and marathon shopping—Black Friday 2017 is here 1:36

Crowds, discounts and marathon shopping—Black Friday 2017 is here

His son 'was failed in Kansas' says father of dead child 4:17

His son 'was failed in Kansas' says father of dead child

Terez A. Paylor breaks down the Chiefs-Bills matchup 2:35

Terez A. Paylor breaks down the Chiefs-Bills matchup

Footage shows North Korean defector's escape 6:39

Footage shows North Korean defector's escape

Watch Tech N9ne perform for KC kids at Santa's Wonderland 2:25

Watch Tech N9ne perform for KC kids at Santa's Wonderland

UCLA's Tyus Edney remembers 1995 victory over Mizzou 1:05

UCLA's Tyus Edney remembers 1995 victory over Mizzou

KU’s 19 three-pointers sets new school record 3:44

KU’s 19 three-pointers sets new school record

Can you take your Thanksgiving turkey on a plane? 1:27

Can you take your Thanksgiving turkey on a plane?

  • Missouri bill would toughen penalties for public corruption cases

    Missouri state Auditor Nicole Galloway and Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker make a pitch for Senate Bill 176, which would allow prosecutors to file felony charges when municipal or county officials defraud taxpayers. The auditor’s office would gain the ability to help investigate such thefts.

Missouri state Auditor Nicole Galloway and Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker make a pitch for Senate Bill 176, which would allow prosecutors to file felony charges when municipal or county officials defraud taxpayers. The auditor’s office would gain the ability to help investigate such thefts. Donna McGuire The Kansas City Star
Missouri state Auditor Nicole Galloway and Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker make a pitch for Senate Bill 176, which would allow prosecutors to file felony charges when municipal or county officials defraud taxpayers. The auditor’s office would gain the ability to help investigate such thefts. Donna McGuire The Kansas City Star

Public corruption cases in Missouri would face tougher penalties if state revises law

December 13, 2016 03:57 PM

UPDATED December 13, 2016 04:43 PM

More Videos

New DCF secretary wants transparency, changes for children 3:57

New DCF secretary wants transparency, changes for children

To Chiefs center Mitch Morse, his brother is just a regular dude 7:09

To Chiefs center Mitch Morse, his brother is just a regular dude

Crowds, discounts and marathon shopping—Black Friday 2017 is here 1:36

Crowds, discounts and marathon shopping—Black Friday 2017 is here

His son 'was failed in Kansas' says father of dead child 4:17

His son 'was failed in Kansas' says father of dead child

Terez A. Paylor breaks down the Chiefs-Bills matchup 2:35

Terez A. Paylor breaks down the Chiefs-Bills matchup

Footage shows North Korean defector's escape 6:39

Footage shows North Korean defector's escape

Watch Tech N9ne perform for KC kids at Santa's Wonderland 2:25

Watch Tech N9ne perform for KC kids at Santa's Wonderland

UCLA's Tyus Edney remembers 1995 victory over Mizzou 1:05

UCLA's Tyus Edney remembers 1995 victory over Mizzou

KU’s 19 three-pointers sets new school record 3:44

KU’s 19 three-pointers sets new school record

Can you take your Thanksgiving turkey on a plane? 1:27

Can you take your Thanksgiving turkey on a plane?

  • New DCF secretary wants transparency, changes for children

    Lt. Gov. Jeff Colyer named Gina Meier-Hummel as the new leader for Kansas' Department for Children and Families. She said she plans to conduct a top-to-bottom review and demand accountability inside the system. Meier-Hummel takes over Dec. 1.