A Swedish hostage taken captive in Algeria, Harald Ickler, saved these items and photos from his time in 2003 as a hostage. The extremists who took him captive would soon become an official arm of al-Qaida in the Algerian desert. While some nations, including the United States, refuse to pay ransoms, many European ones do, inadvertently helping to bankroll the group’s global operations.
A Swedish hostage taken captive in Algeria, Harald Ickler, saved these items and photos from his time in 2003 as a hostage. The extremists who took him captive would soon become an official arm of al-Qaida in the Algerian desert. While some nations, including the United States, refuse to pay ransoms, many European ones do, inadvertently helping to bankroll the group’s global operations. GODRON WELTERS The New York Times
A Swedish hostage taken captive in Algeria, Harald Ickler, saved these items and photos from his time in 2003 as a hostage. The extremists who took him captive would soon become an official arm of al-Qaida in the Algerian desert. While some nations, including the United States, refuse to pay ransoms, many European ones do, inadvertently helping to bankroll the group’s global operations. GODRON WELTERS The New York Times

Al-Qaida relies on ransom money to finance its global terror operations

July 29, 2014 09:48 PM

UPDATED July 29, 2014 10:14 PM

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