Amtrak assistant conductor, Brandon Bostian stands by as Sandra Palmer, center, says goodbye to her boyfriend, Clyde Simpson, before he boards the train at the Amtrak station in St. Louis. Federal investigators have determined that an Amtrak train that crashed in Philadelphia on Tuesday, May 12, 2015, killing at least seven people, was careening through the city at 106 mph before it ran off the rails along a sharp curve. The attorney for Bostian, the engineer at the controls of the train, said Thursday, his client has no recollection of the accident.
Amtrak assistant conductor, Brandon Bostian stands by as Sandra Palmer, center, says goodbye to her boyfriend, Clyde Simpson, before he boards the train at the Amtrak station in St. Louis. Federal investigators have determined that an Amtrak train that crashed in Philadelphia on Tuesday, May 12, 2015, killing at least seven people, was careening through the city at 106 mph before it ran off the rails along a sharp curve. The attorney for Bostian, the engineer at the controls of the train, said Thursday, his client has no recollection of the accident. Huy Richard Mach AP
Amtrak assistant conductor, Brandon Bostian stands by as Sandra Palmer, center, says goodbye to her boyfriend, Clyde Simpson, before he boards the train at the Amtrak station in St. Louis. Federal investigators have determined that an Amtrak train that crashed in Philadelphia on Tuesday, May 12, 2015, killing at least seven people, was careening through the city at 106 mph before it ran off the rails along a sharp curve. The attorney for Bostian, the engineer at the controls of the train, said Thursday, his client has no recollection of the accident. Huy Richard Mach AP

Lawyer: Amtrak train engineer doesn’t remember deadly wreck

May 14, 2015 10:30 AM