Buzz Chatter Tuesday: Danforth bemoans the loss of compromise

10/08/2013 8:37 AM

10/08/2013 8:37 AM

• “People are worried about the debt ceiling — it could be the little drop that could trigger another crisis in financial markets.” — Alain Frachon, a columnist and former Washington correspondent for Le Monde in The New York Times.

Financial experts are nervous from London to Singapore — a point that appears lost on the right honorables in Washington.

• “The Democrats are not getting off scot-free. Fifty-seven percent of Americans are also angry at the way the Democrats are dealing with the shutdown. And a 53 percent majority say they are also angry at President Obama.” — CNN Polling Director Keating Holland on a new survey out Monday.

Holland said the poll shows that 63 percent of those questioned said they were angry at the Republicans over the shutdown. Bottom line: Politicians of all persuasions are being hurt here.

• “As it is prolonged, people will start looking for someone to blame. When they look for someone to blame, it will be House Republicans. Whether it is real or not, it does not matter.” — Kansas state Rep. J.R. Claeys, a Salina Republican, told the HuffPost.

Claeys was one of a number of Republicans quoted in the piece, which chronicled a growing impatience with the shutdown.

• “The stuff of politics, which is compromise, is gone. It’s gone from both sides, and that’s the tragedy here.” — former Missouri Sen. Jack Danforth, a Republican, in the Post-Dispatch.

No question about it. That is the tragedy of our times when it comes to American politics.

• “Deliver us from the hypocrisy of attempting to sound reasonable while being unreasonable.” — U.S. Senate chaplain Barry C. Black.

The seventh-day Adventist is making quite a name for himself through his daily scoldings of the good senators.

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