Columnist Mark Morris writes: The U.S. has a high incarceration rate in part because of our practice of sending nonviolent first-time offenders to prison. Such was the case with Jon, who just finished a sentence of five years and 10 months in federal prison. His crime? Building and distributing electronic boxes knowing that other people would use them to steal premium cable TV.
Columnist Mark Morris writes: The U.S. has a high incarceration rate in part because of our practice of sending nonviolent first-time offenders to prison. Such was the case with Jon, who just finished a sentence of five years and 10 months in federal prison. His crime? Building and distributing electronic boxes knowing that other people would use them to steal premium cable TV. File photo
Columnist Mark Morris writes: The U.S. has a high incarceration rate in part because of our practice of sending nonviolent first-time offenders to prison. Such was the case with Jon, who just finished a sentence of five years and 10 months in federal prison. His crime? Building and distributing electronic boxes knowing that other people would use them to steal premium cable TV. File photo

Mark Morris: Did nonviolent first-time offender need five years in prison?

January 04, 2015 10:19 PM

More Videos

  • Stepson of slain KCK Police Capt. Robert David Melton, prepares for boxing in Guns N’ Hoses charity event

    Merriam police officer Brad Thomas, stepson of slain Kansas City, Kansas police Capt. Robert "Dave" Melton, has been training to join area police officers, firefighters and EMT/paramedics for the upcoming Guns N’ Hoses 2017 Charity Boxing Event. The event raises money for the Kansas City Crime Commission’s Surviving Spouse and Family Endowment Fund. Video by John Sleezer and Joe Robertson/The Kansas City Star