Columnist Dave Helling writes: It now takes 60 votes to consider virtually anything in the U.S. Senate, which gives the minority party its only real power: to block progress. Republicans filibustered dozens of measures in the last Congress, to the Democrats’ chagrin. Now the situation has flipped. Ending the filibuster would make the majority party more powerful, but perhaps that would be a good thing.
Columnist Dave Helling writes: It now takes 60 votes to consider virtually anything in the U.S. Senate, which gives the minority party its only real power: to block progress. Republicans filibustered dozens of measures in the last Congress, to the Democrats’ chagrin. Now the situation has flipped. Ending the filibuster would make the majority party more powerful, but perhaps that would be a good thing. File photo by Andrew Harrer Bloomberg
Columnist Dave Helling writes: It now takes 60 votes to consider virtually anything in the U.S. Senate, which gives the minority party its only real power: to block progress. Republicans filibustered dozens of measures in the last Congress, to the Democrats’ chagrin. Now the situation has flipped. Ending the filibuster would make the majority party more powerful, but perhaps that would be a good thing. File photo by Andrew Harrer Bloomberg

Dave Helling: Senate Democrats play a game we’ve seen before

February 23, 2015 3:22 PM