The digital era has changed many things, but printed school yearbooks still rule. And students putting out their school yearbook may get guidance from a teacher, but students still run the show. While working on the yearbook at Staley High School in the North Kansas City district, Trudy Swegle designed a musical page and the computer keyboard was reflected in her glasses. The school is at 2800 N.E. Shoal Creek Parkway.
The digital era has changed many things, but printed school yearbooks still rule. And students putting out their school yearbook may get guidance from a teacher, but students still run the show. While working on the yearbook at Staley High School in the North Kansas City district, Trudy Swegle designed a musical page and the computer keyboard was reflected in her glasses. The school is at 2800 N.E. Shoal Creek Parkway. SUSAN PFANNMULLER Special to the Star
The digital era has changed many things, but printed school yearbooks still rule. And students putting out their school yearbook may get guidance from a teacher, but students still run the show. While working on the yearbook at Staley High School in the North Kansas City district, Trudy Swegle designed a musical page and the computer keyboard was reflected in her glasses. The school is at 2800 N.E. Shoal Creek Parkway. SUSAN PFANNMULLER Special to the Star

Hardback school yearbooks thrive even in the digital 21st century

February 16, 2016 12:00 PM

UPDATED February 16, 2016 06:00 PM

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