Los Corrals opens in Meadowbrook Village

05/29/2014 7:42 AM

06/03/2014 10:17 AM

Los Corrals restaurant, a downtown staple since 1949, has a new sister restaurant in the Northland.

Stephen Neal purchased the Mexican restaurant, at 408 W. Ninth St., two years ago. He was waiting for the “perfect” opportunity to open a second location when a restaurant space became available in Meadowbrook Village Shopping Center.

“We have quite the following in the Northland so this makes it more convenient to come to Los Corrals and not have parking issues or have to cross the river,” said Neal. “We had some people who were maybe coming down once a month or so; maybe now they will come in weekly.”

He took over the spot — at 6024 N.E. Antioch Road, Suite B, in Gladstone — in March and opened the restaurant on May 17.

Both longtime Los Corrals customers — who don’t need to look at a menu — and new ones are opting for the deep fried tacos, pork burrito spread with cheese, and the rib dinner (pork spare ribs with green pepper sauce, refried beans and rice). The restaurant also serves tostadas, enchiladas, tamales, Mexican chili, taco salad, steak fajitas, Monterey chicken, carne asada, guacamole burgers and more.

Neal made the lamps hanging over the bar by recycling used Patrón bottles. He also brightened up the space with colorful walls and original art by local artist Bobby Moreno.

The new Los Corrals has five beers on tap, and offers frozen, flavored or on-the-rocks margaritas, along with a traditional hand-crafted margarita.

The Gladstone space formerly housed Tanner’s Bar & Grill and then Diego’s Bar & Grill.

Meadowbrook Village Shopping Center is scheduled to be remodeled starting in July, including new landscaping and new lighting. The owners hope that will bring in other new restaurant and retail tenants.

Crossroads clothier

Three years ago, Tara Light started her namesake clothing line offering “classic silhouettes but with a little bit of spunk in the color, the fabric or the design of the fabric.”

She showcased the line in the West 18th Street Fashion Show in 2011 and 2012 in the Crossroads Arts District. So when she was ready to showcase the line in a brick-and-mortar location, the Crossroads beckoned.

“I wanted to be surrounded by other creative people,” she said.

Her new Fable, at 1515 Walnut St., sells her Tara Light line along with women’s apparel by other emerging, independent American designers, including Litke, Ilana Kohn and Feral Childe.

Light had worked in retail while in college and for awhile after earning her English degree at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

“I would look at things and think ‘I can make that’ or ‘I would change this,’” she said.

At Fable, apparel prices run from $100 to $400. Jewelry pieces starts at $50. In keeping with the Fable name, Light also is featuring artwork based on Aesop’s Fables, currently pieces by former Kansas City resident Kathryn Zaremba.

Light also will showcase her line at the 14th Annual West 18th Street Fashion Show at 8 p.m. on June 14, on 18th Street between Baltimore and Wyandotte streets.

New pizzeria for Waldo

Waldo Pizza has held court in the Waldo neighborhood for nearly 30 years.

Now a new competitor has opened just a couple of blocks away.

Pizza Manifesto, a fast-casual Neapolitan-style pizzeria, opened May 22, at 505 W. 75th St.

As customers walk down the counter they make selections for “pizza your way.” There’s a choice of sauces — marinara (plum tomatoes and sea salt), bianca (garlic and olive oil), or mani festo (plum tomatoes, garlic, olive oil and sea salt).

Toppings include pepperoni, prosciutto, meatballs, Fontina cheese, Gorgonzola cheese, spinach, red onions, basil pesto, ricotta, olives, and sun-dried tomatoes. The crust is made from Neapolitan-milled flour, sea salt, and fresh yeast mixed with water. It also offers specialty pizzas and salads, and gelato for dessert.

The pizzas — which come in a 12-inch size, as well as a smaller size for children — are baked in a 700-degree state-of-the-art oven for less than two minutes.

“I believe we have a superior product and we are sticking with the basics — real Neapolitan pizza. We imported our flour, our tomatoes and our olive oil,” said Bryan Grissell, managing partner of Pizza Manifesto with a silent partner.

Pizza Manifesto plans to soon add beer and wine to the menu.

Grissell and his silent partner plan to open more locations.

Waldo Pizza, just a couple of blocks away at 7433 Broadway, opened in 1987.

“There are a lot of different pizzas for a lot of different tastes. Sometimes the more the merrier,” said Phil Bourne, owner of Waldo Pizza.

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