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  • How the zipper merge coming to Johnson County works

    An upcoming construction project to make repairs to the northbound U.S. 69 bridge over 119th Street in Johnson County will use the zipper merge. Under this method, drivers wait to merge, using the closing lane to the point where it closes. They then take turns merging, like the teeth on a zipper. This will be the first time in Kansas that this type of merge is used. Here's an explanation of how it works.

An upcoming construction project to make repairs to the northbound U.S. 69 bridge over 119th Street in Johnson County will use the zipper merge. Under this method, drivers wait to merge, using the closing lane to the point where it closes. They then take turns merging, like the teeth on a zipper. This will be the first time in Kansas that this type of merge is used. Here's an explanation of how it works. Kansas Department of Transportation
An upcoming construction project to make repairs to the northbound U.S. 69 bridge over 119th Street in Johnson County will use the zipper merge. Under this method, drivers wait to merge, using the closing lane to the point where it closes. They then take turns merging, like the teeth on a zipper. This will be the first time in Kansas that this type of merge is used. Here's an explanation of how it works. Kansas Department of Transportation

Zipper merge starts on Johnson County project Tuesday

June 30, 2016 11:10 AM

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  • Golf club's fans are 'horribly loud,' according to neighbors

    One resident sues after gasoline-powered fan makes life near the 12th green like “living next to an airport.” The club says it's using these fans to fight fungal disease.