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April 9, 2014

Julia Louis-Dreyfus jokingly blames 'Veep' sidekick for flub on naked Rolling Stone cover

Julia Louis-Dreyfus is the buzz today, naked on the cover of Rolling Stone. The former “Seinfeld” star posed for photographer Mark Seliger with her back to the camera to show off the U.S. Constitution (presumably) temporarily inked there. But note the famous John Hancock signature placed where the sun don’t shine.
Julia Louis-Dreyfus is the buzz today, naked on the cover of Rolling Stone

, which crowned her “The First Lady of Comedy.”

The former “Seinfeld” star posed for photographer Mark Seliger with her back to the camera to show off the U.S. Constitution (presumably) temporarily inked there.

But note the famous John Hancock signature placed where the sun don’t shine.

Don't the folks at Rolling Stone know that he signed the Declaration of Independence?

Louis-Dreyfus jokingly blamed the blunder on Mike McClintock, the fictional "Veep" character played by Matt Walsh who serves as communications director to Louis-Dreyfus' Vice President Selina Meyer on the HBO comedy series.

"Yet another Mike (expletive)," the 53-year-old actress posted Wednesday on Twitter. "Dummy."

Melissa Bruno, publicity director for Wenner Media, tells Politico that "the Declaration of Independence is on the other side but we couldn’t fit in all the signatures."

The cover gives homage to her new HBO hit series, “Veep,” which started its third season on Sunday. She plays foul-mouthed vice president Selina Meyer on the series, and tells the magazine about the recent dinner she shared with the real vice-president, Joe Biden.

"He loves to tell stories, and I'm a good listener," she said. "I loved that dinner. There was no cynicism, just a very earnest jubilation about being there."

She also tells the magazine that she enjoys all the cursing on the show.

"Once, when we were trying to come up with the particular perfect, horrible, swear-y thing to say in Veep, I said, 'You do realize that if we were 12, we would get in big trouble for this conversation,'" she said.

"That was not part of the curriculum in high school, and the fact that it is now a part of the curriculum of my life is a pleasure, which is the understatement of the universe."

A Senate aide dished to Rolling Stone that “Veep” is "way more realistic than ‘House of Cards’ ... It works because it's revealing truths."

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