Lost in translation: The ‘Bachelor’ Juan Pablo’s gay problem, kissing games

01/21/2014 11:14 AM

01/21/2014 11:27 AM

Spoiler alert. If you have not seen Monday night’s episode of “The Bachelor,” stop right here.

It’s been a busy few days for Juan Pablo Galavis, star of ABC’s “The Bachelor,” and none of it had anything to do with the women competing for his affections, including Kansas City nurse Nikki Ferrell.

Last week, Galavis paid the price for being honest.

At an ABC party on Friday where he talked to several members of the media, Galavis spoke with Sean Daly, a reporter from the TV Page, an entertainment news website.

Daly asked him if he thought a version of “The Bachelor” featuring gays would be a good idea.

“I don’t think it is a good example for kids to watch that on TV,” he told Daly,

who posted audio of the comments

.

The soccer player, raised in Venezuela, offered more.

“Obviously people have their husband and wife and kids and that is how we are brought up. Now there is fathers having kids and all that, and it is hard for me to understand that too in the sense of a household having peoples. ... Two parents sleeping in the same bed and the kid going into bed. ... It is confusing in a sense.

“But I respect them because they want to have kids. They want to be parents. So it is a scale. ... Where do you put it on the scale? Where is the thin line to cross or not? You have to respect everybody’s desires and way of living. But it would be too hard for TV."

Then things seemed to get lost in translation – and controversial – when Galavis said that gay people are “more pervert in a sense.”

Huh?

When the interview got out, celebrity fans of the show aired their disappointment all over Twitter.

Emmy Rossum: “Bachelor Mondays are canceled now in the Rossum household.”

Lena Dunham: “Lesson: some of the people who give you free chocolate turn out to be homophobes :(”

ABC and “The Bachelor” production company Warner Horizon Television immediately slapped their pretty boy’s hand and distanced themselves.

“Juan Pablo’s comments were careless, thoughtless and insensitive, and in no way reflect the views of the network, the show’s producers or studio,” read their statement.

Galavis published a long apology on his own Facebook page, saying that his comment was “taken out of context.” and that “if you listen to the entire interview, there’s nothing but respect for Gay people and their families.

“I have many gay friends and one of my closest friends who’s like a brother has been a constant in my life especially during the past 5 months.

“The word pervert was not what I meant to say and I am very sorry about it. Everyone knows English is my second language and my vocabulary is not as broad as it is in Spanish and, because of this, sometimes I use the wrong words to express myself. What I meant to say was that gay people are more affectionate and intense and for a segment of the TV audience this would be too racy to accept. The show is very racy as it is and I don’t let my 5 year old daughter watch it. Once again, I’m sorry for how my words were taken. I would never disrespect anyone.”

ABC quickly muzzled him, turning down any more interview requests. The only people Galavis is now allowed to speak to publicly are the LGBT Latinos he’s apparently meeting with later this week, thanks to GLAAD.

He apologized on GLAAD’s website, too.

The TV Page’s Sean Daly told The Wall Street Journal that it was “ridiculous for him to blame this on language issue,” when the audio of the interview shows otherwise.

“While the word ‘Pervert’ is what caused the most upsetness, it was the tone and spirit of his overall comments,” Daly told the newspaper.

“He clearly said ‘I don’t think it is a good example for kids to watch that on TV.’ And by the way, the English to Spanish translation of ‘pervert’ is ‘pervertitio’ so this is not a case of something being lost in translation.”

Before he was placed on lock down, Galavis had one last word on Twitter Saturday night: “I WONDER how many people UPSET/DISSAPOINTED at me SPEAKS another LANGUAGE...”

And speaking of tongues ...

On Monday night’s episode of the show, Galavis swapped spit with Sharleen in front of the other women.

Gasp!!!

His predecessor, Sean Lowe, had warned him not to kiss a girl in front of the others. But nothing builds drama (and ratings) like a little jealousy, right?

It happened during a group outing to the L.A. Galaxy’s soccer field. (Took them long enough to work in that soccer angle, didn’t it?)

"(I was) in the middle of a soccer field, are you kidding me? I was like, 'I have to do this,'" he told TVGuide.com.

And if the other women don’t like it? Tough, he said.

“I’m very clear with all of them,” he told TV Guide. “They know what they’re getting into. It’s something I can’t control. I try to be as fair as possible and get to know them as much as I can, but in this situation, there is going to be hurt.”

By the way, he also told TV Guide that he feels “more protective” of Cassandra and Renee. He said they are his “special ones; they're the ones I look at differently than anyone else because they're moms. So, I try to protect them a little bit more and make sure the decisions I make are the right ones as quick as possible because I know they're away from their sons.”

So Monday night, after making pasta for Cassandra – “the last time a guy cooked for me was... never” – a pool party where Kat climbed onto his shoulders for a chicken fight, and he and Chelsie bungee-jumped – “the high dive on crack,” she called it – he gave all but two women a rose.

Nikki Ferrell got one.

Free spirit Lucy Aragon from California and Christy Hansen, a marketing manager from Chicago, did not.

“I can't believe it's over,” said Christy. “Being out here right now is my worst nightmare. I wish I would've opened up faster. This happened because people are way more open than I am. It's not fair. It's really hard for me to open up. I think I should be in there. It's so hard to say goodbye. This sucks.”

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