KC residents get ‘stocking stuffer’ in form of property tax relief

12/19/2013 9:18 PM

12/19/2013 9:18 PM

Kansas City residents are getting some property tax relief just in time for the holidays.

Mayor Sly James and City Manager Troy Schulte reminded residents Thursday that they are entitled to a reduction in their property tax payments, due Dec. 31.

That’s because voters approved a half-cent sales tax for parks in August 2012, coupled with the elimination of three property taxes: the trafficway maintenance tax, the park and boulevard maintenance tax, and the boulevard front foot assessment for people with property along the boulevards.

“Consider this a stocking stuffer from the city, if you will,” James said at a news conference to thank voters and remind them that the sales tax increase also carried some property tax relief.

“It’s a promise made by the city and a promise kept,” he said.

Even though the vote was back in August 2012, it took effect for property owned Jan. 1, 2013. Those property tax bills recently were sent out and are due at the end of this year.

The owner of a $100,000 house and a $15,000 car should see a tax reduction of about $46 annually. People with property along the boulevards who previously paid the front foot assessment will see a somewhat bigger drop in their taxes.

Schulte said elimination of the three small property taxes also makes the city treasurer’s tax collections easier and more efficient to administer because the city doesn’t have to calculate the small levies and each owner’s boulevard front footage.

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