Charges filed in Kansas City home invasion

09/21/2013 12:11 PM

09/22/2013 1:03 AM

Four Kansas City men arrested after a high-speed police chase were charged Saturday in connection with an attempted home invasion robbery and shooting that led to the chase.

One victim and one invader were wounded by gunfire in the incident, which began about 7:45 a.m. Friday in the 7100 block of East 111th Terrace when a man was accosted outside by several armed men.

According to court documents, the man was forced at gunpoint to knock on a neighbor’s back door. When the neighbor answered, the first man was forced inside. The neighbor ran to a bedroom to get a gun. When he came out of the room, one of the gunmen fired at him and the neighbor returned fire.

The man who had been accosted outside was struck by several shots, and the armed men left the home. Police answering the call spotted a vehicle leaving the area and gave chase.

The vehicle reached speeds of 90 mph, ran at least one red light and at times was driven into oncoming traffic, according to court documents.

The vehicle crashed near the intersection of Bannister Road and Missouri 350, and the people inside were arrested.

Marlyn L. Standifer, 25; Theodore Watkins Jr., 23; and Joshua L. Fields, 29, with a grazing bullet wound to his neck, each were charged in Jackson County Circuit Court with attempted first-degree robbery, first-degree burglary, kidnapping and two counts of armed criminal action. Jonathan L. Fields, 30, was charged with attempted first-degree robbery and armed criminal action.

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