Missouri lawmakers start overriding vetoes

09/11/2013 1:27 PM

09/11/2013 2:35 PM

Missouri lawmakers have voted to override a line-item budget veto of $1 million to help rebuild a vocational education school in northeast Missouri.

The House’s 112-47 vote was the first taken Wednesday as lawmakers considered 33 vetoes by Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon. Senators then approved the override 28-5.

At issue is money targeted for the Pike-Lincoln Technical Center, which was damaged by a fire. Although the school had insurance, bill supporters said it was not enough to outfit the building with computers and make it accessible to people with disabilities.

Nixon said he vetoed the bill because of the source of the money. He said lawmakers want to pay for the repairs from a fund dedicated for the state school funding formula.

In other action:

Jobless benefits:

Missouri senators have voted to override a veto of legislation that could make it harder for workers to receive jobless benefits by expanding what counts as misconduct.

Jobless benefits can be denied to a worker who loses a position because of misbehavior. The unemployment legislation seeks to broaden it to include things like unapproved absences or the violation of a company rule.

The Senate voted 24-10 on Wednesday to override Nixon’s veto. The legislation now goes to the House.

Nixon had said the legislation would broaden the definition of misconduct to cover activities occurring outside the workplace and work hours.

Injured workers:

The Senate has voted to override a veto of legislation calling for creation of an online database of workers’ compensation claims.

Wednesday’s 25-9 Senate vote sent the bill to the House, which passed it earlier this year with less than the two-thirds majority needed to override a veto.

Under the measure, businesses could provide a potential employee’s name and Social Security Number to identify the date of workers’ compensation claims and whether the claim is open or closed.

Supporters say the bill would help businesses control workers’ compensation costs. Nixon cited privacy concerns when he vetoed the legislation and called it “an affront to the privacy of our citizens.”

Agriculture:

The Senate has voted to override a veto of an agriculture measure.

The legislation includes changes to Missouri’s animal abuse and neglect law and a longer maximum prison sentence for stealing livestock. It also would replace a prohibition on foreign ownership of farmland with a 1 percent cap.

Nixon had objected to the provisions on foreign ownership and animal abuse.

The Senate voted 23-10 Wednesday to override the veto, sending the measure to the House, where 109 votes are needed to override. The House passed the bill earlier 133-21.

Proponents of the bill contend changes to the animal abuse and neglect law are needed and that tougher punishment for stealing livestock could help combat cattle rustling.

Foster parents:

The Senate has voted to override a veto of legislation on fingerprinting of foster parents.

The Senate’s 25-9 vote Wednesday sent the bill to the House.

The bill would require people providing emergency foster care or seeking licensure as a foster parent to submit three sets of fingerprints instead of the current two sets.

The extra set of prints would be kept by a division within the Department of Social Services so that people would not have to submit new fingerprints every two years.

Health care volunteers:

The Senate has voted to override a veto of legislation seeking to shield volunteer health care providers from lawsuits.

The measure would prevent civil damages against the volunteers unless there was a gross deviation from the ordinary standard of care or willful misconduct.

Supporters contend the bill would let doctors, nurses, pharmacists and others provide free health care for sponsoring organizations by protecting them against claims.

Gov. Jay Nixon vetoed the legislation and said allowing coverage through the State Legal Expense Fund would encourage volunteerism and protect those who have been harmed.

Senators voted 25-9 on Wednesday to override the veto. The measure now goes to the House.

UN agreement:

Missouri senators have voted to override a veto of legislation barring state or local officials from adopting policies infringing upon private property rights and traceable to Agenda 21.

Agenda 21 is a nonbinding resolution adopted in 1992 by the United Nations that encouraged sustainable development. Its title is a reference to the 21st century, and it encourages changes in global consumption, management and conservation practices.

Senators supported the override 24-6 on Wednesday. It now moves to the House, where it originally passed 118-37.

Nixon said the legislation would require a costly analysis by cities and governmental bodies to determine whether a zoning ordinance can be traced to the resolution. Supporters say their concern is infringement of personal property rights without due process.

Videos

Join the Discussion

The Kansas City Star is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Terms of Service