KU student gets $90,000 NASA fellowship

07/08/2013 7:18 AM

07/08/2013 7:18 AM

A University of Kansas student has received a NASA fellowship to design better tools for predicting how climate change will affect sea levels.

Theresa Stumpf of Wentzville, Mo., is a doctoral student in electrical engineering at the university's Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets. Her fellowship is worth $90,000 over three years.

She'll conduct research on a new type of ice-penetrating radar. The university says the new radar is designed to gather data from a wider area and provide a much clearer picture of the conditions where the ice meets bedrock.

Whether there's solid ice, melting ice or water at that point influences the speed of the ice flow to the oceans. The faster the ice flows, the more it affects sea level rise.

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