The Wyandotte National Burying Ground in downtown Kansas City, Kan., includes the grave of Eliza Burton Conley, who in 1910 became the first Native American to argue in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. She lost the case but won the battle, as developers gave up plans to buy the cemetery and move all the graves to the Quindaro Cemetery. The Wyandotte National Burying Ground, at North Seventh and Ann streets, for decades has been called the Huron Indian Cemetery.
The Wyandotte National Burying Ground in downtown Kansas City, Kan., includes the grave of Eliza Burton Conley, who in 1910 became the first Native American to argue in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. She lost the case but won the battle, as developers gave up plans to buy the cemetery and move all the graves to the Quindaro Cemetery. The Wyandotte National Burying Ground, at North Seventh and Ann streets, for decades has been called the Huron Indian Cemetery. Donna McGuire dmcguire@kcstar.com
The Wyandotte National Burying Ground in downtown Kansas City, Kan., includes the grave of Eliza Burton Conley, who in 1910 became the first Native American to argue in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. She lost the case but won the battle, as developers gave up plans to buy the cemetery and move all the graves to the Quindaro Cemetery. The Wyandotte National Burying Ground, at North Seventh and Ann streets, for decades has been called the Huron Indian Cemetery. Donna McGuire dmcguire@kcstar.com

Native American cemetery in Kansas City, Kan., is now a National Historic Landmark

February 26, 2017 08:09 PM