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  • Special glasses allow colorblind people to see world more vividly

    Three area men with color vision deficiency, aka color blindness, had the opportunity to see the world a bit more colorfully Wednesday, as they tried on special EnChroma glasses that allow the wearer to experience more color saturation, distinguish certain colors better and see better detail and depth. Austin Mitchell-Goering, a student at the University of Kansas, 16-year-old Noah Vittengl of Blue Springs and Ryan January of Olathe, try on the glasses at Brill Eye Center in Mission. Brill is the first to carry the glasses in Kansas. Color vision deficiency affects one in eight men and one in 200 women.

Three area men with color vision deficiency, aka color blindness, had the opportunity to see the world a bit more colorfully Wednesday, as they tried on special EnChroma glasses that allow the wearer to experience more color saturation, distinguish certain colors better and see better detail and depth. Austin Mitchell-Goering, a student at the University of Kansas, 16-year-old Noah Vittengl of Blue Springs and Ryan January of Olathe, try on the glasses at Brill Eye Center in Mission. Brill is the first to carry the glasses in Kansas. Color vision deficiency affects one in eight men and one in 200 women. Video by Jill Toyoshiba, story by Matt Campbell The Kansas City Star
Three area men with color vision deficiency, aka color blindness, had the opportunity to see the world a bit more colorfully Wednesday, as they tried on special EnChroma glasses that allow the wearer to experience more color saturation, distinguish certain colors better and see better detail and depth. Austin Mitchell-Goering, a student at the University of Kansas, 16-year-old Noah Vittengl of Blue Springs and Ryan January of Olathe, try on the glasses at Brill Eye Center in Mission. Brill is the first to carry the glasses in Kansas. Color vision deficiency affects one in eight men and one in 200 women. Video by Jill Toyoshiba, story by Matt Campbell The Kansas City Star

Colorblind teen and two men see world anew with special eyeglasses

February 01, 2017 6:42 PM