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  • Syrian refugee families struggle to make KC home

    Nineteen Syrian families who fled the violence in the Middle East have begun new lives half a world away from their homeland in Kansas City. Syrian American businessman, Fariz Turkmani, 59, of Overland Park, is working with the families as an interpreter and a facilitator to help make the transition a little easier. "I'm amazed by the welcome, Muslim and non-Muslim," said one refugee, Mohammad Kamal Al-Khatib, who spoke in Arabic with Turkmani translating. "Whoever passes by says hello to you."

Nineteen Syrian families who fled the violence in the Middle East have begun new lives half a world away from their homeland in Kansas City. Syrian American businessman, Fariz Turkmani, 59, of Overland Park, is working with the families as an interpreter and a facilitator to help make the transition a little easier. "I'm amazed by the welcome, Muslim and non-Muslim," said one refugee, Mohammad Kamal Al-Khatib, who spoke in Arabic with Turkmani translating. "Whoever passes by says hello to you." Tammy Ljungblad The Kansas City Star
Nineteen Syrian families who fled the violence in the Middle East have begun new lives half a world away from their homeland in Kansas City. Syrian American businessman, Fariz Turkmani, 59, of Overland Park, is working with the families as an interpreter and a facilitator to help make the transition a little easier. "I'm amazed by the welcome, Muslim and non-Muslim," said one refugee, Mohammad Kamal Al-Khatib, who spoke in Arabic with Turkmani translating. "Whoever passes by says hello to you." Tammy Ljungblad The Kansas City Star

Syrian families flee civil war, warily make new lives in Kansas City

September 24, 2016 12:00 PM

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  • St. Teresa’s Academy on diversity

    St. Teresa’s Academy President Nan Bone and Board President Michelle Wimes talk diversity and inclusion after swastika and racial bullying at the Catholic school.