When Kira Walker was born with hypoglycemia, doctors turned to genome sequencing to pinpoint the cause. A mutated gene was making parts of Kira’s pancreas hyperactive. Surgery remedied the problem. Now nearly 2, Kira is healthy enough to climb steps on the shore of Lake Waukomis behind her home with her mother, Amanda Webb.
When Kira Walker was born with hypoglycemia, doctors turned to genome sequencing to pinpoint the cause. A mutated gene was making parts of Kira’s pancreas hyperactive. Surgery remedied the problem. Now nearly 2, Kira is healthy enough to climb steps on the shore of Lake Waukomis behind her home with her mother, Amanda Webb. David Eulitt The Kansas City Star
When Kira Walker was born with hypoglycemia, doctors turned to genome sequencing to pinpoint the cause. A mutated gene was making parts of Kira’s pancreas hyperactive. Surgery remedied the problem. Now nearly 2, Kira is healthy enough to climb steps on the shore of Lake Waukomis behind her home with her mother, Amanda Webb. David Eulitt The Kansas City Star

Genome sequencing holds tremendous promise for infants, but issues abound

May 23, 2015 05:05 PM