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  • Awake brain surgery can be good for you and your surgeon

    For many patients, the idea of brain surgery can be scary. This may be especially true if the area being treated is near parts of the brain that control sight, motor skills or speech. Preserving function is what prompted neurosurgeons at Mayo Clinic to perform what's called awake brain surgery. With this surgery, the patient is awake and talking during part of the procedure, so the surgeon knows he or she is safely performing the operation.

Awake brain surgery can be good for you and your surgeon

For many patients, the idea of brain surgery can be scary. This may be especially true if the area being treated is near parts of the brain that control sight, motor skills or speech. Preserving function is what prompted neurosurgeons at Mayo Clinic to perform what's called awake brain surgery. With this surgery, the patient is awake and talking during part of the procedure, so the surgeon knows he or she is safely performing the operation.
Mayo Clinic