Health Care

Informed care picks up the pieces left by trauma

Dozens of Kansas City institutions — including courts and cops, schools and mental health providers — say programs that address a child’s or adult’s traumatic past could help create a better future. Trauma-informed care focuses on the notion that a traumatic event in childhood, either experienced or witnessed, can alter the biology of the brain.

City-sponsored Olathe group acts a strong advocate for people with disabilities

The 15-member Persons With Disabilities Advisory Board, founded in 1985, sponsors popular disability-related events throughout the year, works with architects to make sure buildings are above government standards, and oversees anything related to the disability community in Olathe. It serves as a resource and liaison for the disabled. And it’s the only one of its kind in Johnson County.

John Knox Village adapts to aging trends

As baby boomers reach their golden years, they’re demanding amenities that fit their active lifestyle. That’s why there’s a construction boom on the Lee’s Summit campus of John Knox Village.

Northland Shepherd’s Center lends a helping hand for older adults

Appreciating what older adults have to offer and providing them with the assistance they need are what Northland Shepherd’s Center is all about. Since its founding in 1990, the center has offered programs and services to help older adults lead active lives, remain as self-sufficient as possible and stay in their homes. The center is in the lower level of Antioch Community Church.

City-sponsored Olathe group acts a strong advocate for people with disabilities

The 15-member Persons With Disabilities Advisory Board, founded in 1985, sponsors popular disability-related events throughout the year, works with architects to make sure buildings are above government standards, and oversees anything related to the disability community in Olathe. It serves as a resource and liaison for the disabled. And it’s the only one of its kind in Johnson County.

John Knox Village adapts to aging trends

As baby boomers reach their golden years, they’re demanding amenities that fit their active lifestyle. That’s why there’s a construction boom on the Lee’s Summit campus of John Knox Village.

Northland Shepherd’s Center lends a helping hand for older adults

Appreciating what older adults have to offer and providing them with the assistance they need are what Northland Shepherd’s Center is all about. Since its founding in 1990, the center has offered programs and services to help older adults lead active lives, remain as self-sufficient as possible and stay in their homes. The center is in the lower level of Antioch Community Church.

Videos

Someday the Area Transportation Authority could run much more than buses

The ATA is a government unto itself. It can sell revenue bonds to finance any transportation project it wants. It could build office buildings and roads. It could theoretically run Kansas City International Airport. Recent discussions about the ATA’s bistate compact have local officials brainstorming the possibilities.

Auditor Tom Schweich’s apparent suicide continues to shake Missouri politics

Campaign events were canceled Friday. So was a planned trade mission by Gov. Jay Nixon to Cuba. A replacement for Schweich was named, but only on a temporary basis. And the Missouri Republican Party’s chairman worked to dispel rumors that he had engaged in a whisper campaign targeting Schweich’s religion — a charge Schweich made to reporters by telephone just moments before allegedly taking his own life.

Informed care picks up the pieces left by trauma

Dozens of Kansas City institutions — including courts and cops, schools and mental health providers — say programs that address a child’s or adult’s traumatic past could help create a better future. Trauma-informed care focuses on the notion that a traumatic event in childhood, either experienced or witnessed, can alter the biology of the brain.

Someday the Area Transportation Authority could run much more than buses

The ATA is a government unto itself. It can sell revenue bonds to finance any transportation project it wants. It could build office buildings and roads. It could theoretically run Kansas City International Airport. Recent discussions about the ATA’s bistate compact have local officials brainstorming the possibilities.

Auditor Tom Schweich’s apparent suicide continues to shake Missouri politics

Campaign events were canceled Friday. So was a planned trade mission by Gov. Jay Nixon to Cuba. A replacement for Schweich was named, but only on a temporary basis. And the Missouri Republican Party’s chairman worked to dispel rumors that he had engaged in a whisper campaign targeting Schweich’s religion — a charge Schweich made to reporters by telephone just moments before allegedly taking his own life.

Informed care picks up the pieces left by trauma

Dozens of Kansas City institutions — including courts and cops, schools and mental health providers — say programs that address a child’s or adult’s traumatic past could help create a better future. Trauma-informed care focuses on the notion that a traumatic event in childhood, either experienced or witnessed, can alter the biology of the brain.

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Candidate’s suicide holds up an unflattering mirror to our politics

The suicide death of Missouri auditor and gubernatorial candidate Tom Schweich shines a light on an ugly reality. A candidate could be undercut in some circles by the insinuation that he is not a Christian. In 2015, sad to say, there are still people in my home state and 49 other states who would not vote for a candidate because he or she is Jewish.

Steve Kraske: Do we expect too much of our politicians?

We may never know what caused two-term Missouri auditor Tom Schweich to kill himself in a move that rocked his home state and greatly saddened it too. But we know this: The pressure on our public servants, day in and day out, can be extraordinary. Few are built for the trade.

Candidate’s suicide holds up an unflattering mirror to our politics

The suicide death of Missouri auditor and gubernatorial candidate Tom Schweich shines a light on an ugly reality. A candidate could be undercut in some circles by the insinuation that he is not a Christian. In 2015, sad to say, there are still people in my home state and 49 other states who would not vote for a candidate because he or she is Jewish.

Steve Kraske: Do we expect too much of our politicians?

We may never know what caused two-term Missouri auditor Tom Schweich to kill himself in a move that rocked his home state and greatly saddened it too. But we know this: The pressure on our public servants, day in and day out, can be extraordinary. Few are built for the trade.

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